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Archive | December 17th, 2009

Chex Mix Is a Classic for Good Reason

Chex Mix Is a Classic for Good Reason

Chex Mix

When I was growing up, this was the party mix served by my mother and plenty of other mothers. I gravitate toward a bowl whenever I see it served.

Chex Mix

3 cups Corn Chex
3 cups Rice Chex
3 cups Wheat Chex
1 cup mixed nuts
1 cup bite-sized pretzels
1 cup bite-size garlic-flavored bagel chips
6 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons seasoned salt
3/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

In a large bowl, mix cereals, nuts, pretzels and bagel chips. Set aside. In an ungreased large roasting pan, melt butter in oven. Stir in Worcestershire sauce, seasoned salt, garlic powder and onion powder. Gradually stir in cereal mixture until evenly coated. Bake 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes. Spread on paper towels to cool, about 15 minutes. Store in an airtight container.

For microwave: Mix cereals, nuts, pretzels and bagel chips in a microwavable bowl. Set aside. In a small microwavable bowl, microwave butter uncovered on high for about 40 seconds or until melted. Stir in Worcestershire sauce, seasoned salt, garlic powder and onion powder. Pour over cereal mixture. Stir until evenly coated.

Microwave uncovered on high 5 to 6 minutes, thoroughly stirring every 2 minutes. Spread on paper towels to cool. Store in an airtight container.

For variations on this classic, from Taco-Seasoned to Cranberry-Nut-Cinnamon party mix,  click here.

Makes 24 (1/2 cup) servings.

From Chex

(photo: Jeff Golenski)

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Ask a Foodie: Dark and Light Brown Sugar – What’s the Difference?

Ask a Foodie: Dark and Light Brown Sugar – What’s the Difference?

CubedSugarQ. Dear SavorSA:  I have been wondering what the difference is (aside from the color) between light and dark brown sugar?  If a recipe specifies one, can you use the other?  If a recipe doesn’t specify, what should you use?  — Alison

A. Dear Alison: This is a good question. I know I always seem to have one type in the cupboard when the recipe is asking for the other kind. Both light and dark brown sugar are flavored with molasses, which gives the sugar a soft texture.  The darker sugar will have a stronger taste of molasses, so a cook might just decide which flavor would be preferable.

Usually, light brown sugar is called for more often, so if a recipe doesn’t specify I assume it is light brown sugar. Also, if you have only dark brown sugar, you could mix it half and half with granulated sugar to cut down some on the molasses taste. Good luck!

If you have a question for a foodie, e-mail walker@savorsa.com.

(Photo: Gaston Thauvin)

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