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Archive | January 29th, 2013

Easiest and Best? High-Heat Roast Chicken Gets Our Vote

Easiest and Best? High-Heat Roast Chicken Gets Our Vote

This information has been in the wind for the past few years: The best way to roast a chicken is to cook it at high heat, 10 minutes per pound, let it sit for 10 minutes after the roasting. Carve and serve.

The high heat method of roasting chicken gives you golden skin, moist and tender meat.

The high-heat method of roasting chicken gives you golden skin, moist and tender meat.

Could something this easy be the “best” way to roast the bird?

If I’d listened, roasted and learned instead of continuing to baste, roll the bird over on its breast, brine, truss, stuff — and anything else one can do to roast a bird, I’d have saved myself some time. As it is, we tried the high-heat method this week and it was a success.

That golden, crackling skin, blistered here and there, the tender, cooked-just-right breast meat … even the pan juices seemed to be superior in this method, as they sizzled and reduced to a thick, sticky mass in the bottom of the pan, begging to be used for gravy.

I used what was described as an “all natural” chicken, with no antibiotics or hormones added. I seasoned simply with black truffle salt and pepper. I didn’t do a full truss on the chicken, but I did tie together the feet. I don’t think I’ll do that next time.  As you can see in the photo, the wing tips got burnt — no big deal to us.

I’ve seen this method, along with similar recipes calling for a few more ingredients, such as garlic cloves stuffed under skin, or lemons and onions pushed into the cavity — so look around the Internet if you want something a little fancier.

Barbara Kafka is often credited with teaching us this method. Chowhound has a recipe and accompanying article that is a little more complex.

However, this is the easiest way I’ve found to go about making this Sunday dinner classic — and the results were gratifying.

Link to Barbara Kafka’s recipe

High-Heat Roast Chicken

A little vegetable oil
1 4-5 pound roasting chicken
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste
A few peeled garlic cloves to tuck here and there, optional

Preheat oven to 500 degrees.

Rub a little oil at the bottom of the roasting pan. (I sometimes use a roasting rack, but not with this recipe). Let the chicken sit out to bring to room temperature. Put the chicken in the pan. There’s no need to truss. (I tied the feet together, but won’t even do that next time – I think the leg and thigh skin would get more gold and crackly if just exposed to the heat.)

If using some garlic, you can put a clove or two in the cavity, or tuck some under between the leg and the body of the chicken.

Put the chicken in the 500-degree oven for 10 minutes per pound. (Barbara Kafka’s recipe specifies putting the chicken into the oven feet first.) If you don’t want burnt wing tips, wrap them in a little aluminum foil.

When the time comes to take it out, set the chicken in a warm place on the stove and let it rest for 10-15 minutes. Carve and serve.

Makes 5-6 servings.

 

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Brisket, Sausage, and Chicken, Oh My: Meat Week Continues Through Sunday

Brisket, Sausage, and Chicken, Oh My: Meat Week Continues Through Sunday

What barbecue do you want to try during Meat Week?

What barbecue do you want to try during Meat Week?

“It was a hot winter’s day in Tallahassee, Florida. Two bored co-workers, Chris Cantey and Erni Walker, sat in an office pretending to edit video footage of an insurance seminar. To take a break from the monotony of escrow lectures, they decided to play with the random word generator on Chris’s website. It summoned the holy combination of Meat-Week. They decided it would be a holiday during which BBQ was eaten every night of the week. It was scheduled for two Sundays later (the day after Sorcerer Day), which happened to be the last Sunday in January.”

That was back in 2005, according to the Meat Week website. The event has since grown beyond Florida to encompass a growing number of cities across this country. This year marks the first time that San Antonio has a part of the event, and that’s all due to the sponsorship and efforts of Noel Cisneros and Denise Aguirre, owners of the Point Park & Eats, 24188 Boerne Stage Road.

The tastings around town began Sunday at Two Bros. BBQ Market and continued Monday at Bobby G’s Old School BBQ and Catering.

Here’s the lineup for the rest of the week:

7 p.m. Tuesday: Outlaw BBQ and The Institute of Chili at Alamo Street Eats Food Park & Bar. (It’s part of Downtown Tuesday, so parking is free in city garages.)

6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Augie’s Barbed Wire Smokehouse, 3709 N. St. Mary’s, near the San Antonio Zoo.

6:30 p.m. Thursday: The Granary Cue & Brew, Avenue A at the Pearl Brewery. An RSVP is required for this event and seating is limited. Send your RSVP to MeatWeekSATX@yahoo.com.

Noon Friday: Lunch at Congers Smoke Shack. Congers Smoke Shack is a food truck at the corner of Loop 410 and Nacogdoches. The location is non alcoholic. You may want to bring your own chairs as limited seating is available. Your Meat Week Captains will have their pickup on site and tailgate down!

7 p.m. Friday: Dinner at Mortons BBQ trailer. Mortons is located off U.S. 281 at the corner of Thousand Oaks and Henderson Pass.

2 p.m. Saturday: Bolner’s Meat Company, 2900 S. Flores St.

Noon Sunday: The Point Park & Eats. The last day of Meat Week will be at The Point food truck park and bar at 24188 Boerne Stage Road. The Super Bowl will be on the giant outdoor screen, and the bar has more than 85 beers to choose from. Saint Arnold Brewing Co. will have beer samples from 1-4 p.m. The park is kid- and pet-friendly.

 

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