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Weeknight Porchetta Is Bursting with Flavor

Weeknight Porchetta Is Bursting with Flavor

This porchetta dish is easy to make.

This porchetta dish is easy to make.

What’s in a name? We’ve been asking ourselves that since Shakespeare proffered the question in “Romeo and Juliet.”

We asked it again when we spied this recipe for Weeknight Porchetta from the January 2015 issue of Bon Appetit magazine. Yes, it was the name “porchetta” that attracted our attention, but there were so many differences in approach that we were skeptical, despite Alison Roman’s introduction: “Sometimes it’s OK to cut corners. Here we make the classic Italian dish with bacon and skip the multiday air-drying process. It’s not traditional, but it sure is delicious.”

We gave it a try anyway and was pleasantly surprised at how satisfying the dish was on so many levels.

The roasted garlic is perfect by itself, if you want an appetizer to spread on toast; or you could pair it with another cut of meat, such as a juicy steak or a thick slab of prime rib.

Roman offers this insight into why you wrap the tenderloin in bacon: “As the bacon cooks, the fat renders, basting the tenderloin with flavor and ensuring it stays juicy (all while cooking perfectly itself). To keep the bacon in place, wrap the slices around the tenderloin, tucking ends underneath each other.”

One time we made the dish, we varied it by adding slices of apples at the last minute. The slices added to the overall dish; whether you like the baked apple slices depends on your fondness for rosemary, because they absorbed a lot of the herb’s flavor.

Weeknight Porchetta

Use apple if you'd like.

Use apple if you’d like.

4 garlic cloves, finely chopped, plus 2 bulbs, halved crosswise
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary, plus 4 sprigs
1 tablespoon fennel seeds, coarsely chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided use
Freshly ground black pepper
1 (1 1/2-pound) pork tenderloin
6-8 slices bacon
1-2 apples, cored and cut in small slices (optional)

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Toss chopped garlic, chopped rosemary, fennel seeds, salt and 1 tablespoon oil in a small bowl; season with pepper.

Rub garlic mixture over all tenderloin (if you have time to do this in the morning, great; refrigerate pork until dinner). Scatter rosemary sprigs in a large baking dish and set tenderloin on top. Wrap bacon slices around tenderloin, tucking ends underneath, so bacon stays put. Nestle halved heads of garlic around tenderloin and add apple slices, if using. Drizzle everything with remaining 1 tablespoon oil.

Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of tenderloin registers 145 degrees for medium, 40-45 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and let rest at least 10 minutes before slicing.

Approximate nutritional value per serving: 300 calories, 15 g fat, 1 g fiber

Adapted from Bon Appetit January 2015

 

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Chefs for Chefs Rallies for a Great Cause

Chefs for Chefs Rallies for a Great Cause

Mole ice cream from Brindles featured a lively mix of chile, cinnamon and chocolate flavors.

Mole ice cream from Brindles featured a lively mix of chile, cinnamon and chocolate flavors.

San Antonio’s top chefs came together Sunday to help one of their own. The fourth Chefs for Chefs was held at Rosario’s North as a fundraiser for chef Ana Martinez, who was recently injured in an auto accident. Her appearance at the event was a welcome sign that she is on the road to recovery.

Ana Martinez made an appearance at the Chefs for Chefs event in her honor.

Ana Martinez made an appearance at the Chefs for Chefs event in her honor.

The local chapter of Les Dames d’Escoffier also helped one of their members by organizing the event, which offered a host of brunch treats for patrons. Davila’s BBQ in Seguin offered barbacoa with Big Red, the Boiler House served up scrambled eggs with veal brains and bacon, Frederick’s paired a fish empanada with toasted covered escargots and mushrooms in a cream sauce, who Chez Vatel Bistro .

Botika’s Geronimo Lopez and Aldaco’s both served up different ceviche dishes, while Biga on the Banks used the freshest heirloom tomatoes of the season with salmon. Mixtli offered a corn-infused treat called a chocoyota with menonita cheese. The Grill at Leon Springs offered pork in savory stock, while Jason Dady’s group dressed up deviled eggs with jumbo lump crab meat.

Those with a sweet tooth had their choice of everything from a doughnut hole flambe from Don Strange to mole ice cream from Brindles.

All of treats were all for a good cause, and the audience ate it up with gusto.

If you would like to contribute to the fund, mail a check to LDEI (Les Dames d’Escoffier International) and mark Ana Martinez’s name on the note line. For the address, click here.

The bar staff from Rosario's North kept patrons happy with bloody Marys and margaritas.

The bar staff from Rosario’s North kept patrons happy with bloody Marys and margaritas.

Luke's John Russ served up some mighty fine shrimp and grits.

Luke’s John Russ served up some mighty fine shrimp and grits.

Espresso Amore Mio kept coffee drinks brewing.

Espresso Amore Mio kept coffee drinks brewing.

Black Gold Eggs featured a cured egg yolk with a sorrel custard and Black Gold garlic caviar.

Black Gold Eggs featured a cured egg yolk with a sorrel custard and Black Gold garlic caviar.

Cured offered an array of charcuterie along with pickled cauliflower and packages of toothpicks.

Cured offered an array of charcuterie along with pickled cauliflower and packages of toothpicks.

Who can resist raspberry and pistachio macarons from Bakery Lorraine?

Who can resist raspberry and pistachio macarons from Bakery Lorraine?

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This Chocolate Fig Tart Tastes Even Better Than It Looks

This Chocolate Fig Tart Tastes Even Better Than It Looks

Mom’s birthday was last week, and I made the trek to Louisville to help the folks celebrate. I didn’t have time to work up all the figs from the backyard, so I filled my suitcase with tins of fresh fruit. (In a way, it was like bringing coals to Newcastle, to use that old cliche, because their fig bushes were covered with enormous, juicy figs.)

fig tartWhat to do with them? I know she likes chocolate, so I had to include that somehow. That’s when I got the idea of making a ganache and serving it with the figs and a crust using my go-to pastry recipe. Here’s the end result, which was more beautiful than I had imagined and the flavor was even better.

Chocolate Fig Tart

Crust:
12 tablespoons butter, at room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/8 teaspoon almond extract or 1/2 teaspoon vanilla or your choice of flavoring
1 1/2 cups flour

Oven-roasted figs:
12 fresh figs (I have black mission figs)
2 tablespoons honey

Ganache:
1 (85 g) bar 70% or darker chocolate, to taste
1/2 cup canned milk, plus more
Pinch of sea salt
For the crust: Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

 

In a stand mixer, cream butter and add sugar, sea salt and flavoring on medium. Reduce speed to low and slowly add flour to create a dough. Press the dough into a 9-inch circular tart pan. Cover the dough with a sheet of aluminum foil and weight it down. Bake for 8 minutes. Then uncover and bake another 5 minutes or until golden brown. (If you don’t want to overbake, turn the oven off 2 or 3 minutes before you think it will be done.) Set aside and let cool. Once it’s cool, remove from the tart pan and place on a serving plate.

For the figs: Pre-heat the broiler with the rack as close to the top as possible.

 

Take half of the figs and slice them thinly lengthwise. Quarter the rest of the figs. Place on a rack. Brush them with honey. Place under the broiler and let them roast. Watch closely and remove as soon as the honey on top starts to boil. Set aside and let cool.

For the ganache: When ready to assemble, set up a double boiler and melt the chocolate. Stir in the milk at little at a time until you reach the desired consistency. Add a pinch of salt.

fig tart3

On the crust, lay out the fig slices in concentric circles, starting at the outside and building in until the top is covered. Carefully spread the ganache over the center and out just to the edge of the fig slices. Top the tart with the quartered figs, starting at the center with three fig quarters and working out to the edge of the chocolate.

fig tart2

Serve with whipped cream, raspberries or raspberry sauce, if desired.

Makes 1 tart.

From John Griffin

 

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How to Prepare Jackfruit

How to Prepare Jackfruit

Jackfruit at the market

Jackfruit at the market

If you’ve been in an H-E-B produce section lately, you’ve probably seen them. They look like something monstrous left over from a 1950s sci-fi flick, such as “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” where enormous pods threaten to take over civilization.

Strands of fresh jackfruit flesh

Strands of fresh jackfruit flesh

The sign up above says it’s something called jackfruit. But it might help if you knew what to do with it, even beyond the short list of directions at the market.

So, let’s start at the beginning.

Jackfruit is grown in Southeast Asia, and each fruit can weigh any where from 10 to 100 pounds. A single tree can bear dozens of fruit, which makes it ideal for feeding starving masses, that is, if they know what to do with it, too.

It takes an effort to work up jackfruit.

It takes an effort to work up jackfruit.

If you’re shopping for a jackfruit, look for one with no outside bruises or cuts. It should also have a fairly distinct aroma, which will become stronger when you cut into it.

If you buy a jackfruit that is too green, it will ooze a sticky latex, according to an Australian group, The Sub-Tropical Fruit Club of Qld: “The quantity of latex decreases as the fruit ripens. Try to cut a fruit that is green and you will have latex all over you. Cut into an over ripe fruit and there is almost no latex.   If you do get the sap on your hands you can easily get it off using lanoline soap, the kind they use in industry.”

There's plenty of skin, seeds and core.

There’s plenty of skin, seeds and core.

If you have time, cut a few gashes into the fruit a couple of days before you prepare it and let the latex ooze out on its own.

It has a rough skin that’s fairly solid, so you’ll need a strong knife — or machete — to break into it. Don’t use your best kitchen knife for that job. Once inside, you’ll find strands of pale yellow fruit flesh surrounding more rock-hard seeds. An equally hard core can be found at the center. So, you have to skin it, seed it and core it before you can enjoy it. Believe me, this takes a little work. And it creates no small amount of waste.

I have to confess that I didn’t buy a whole jackfruit. There was a cut piece in the refrigerated section, which still weighed about 8 pounds, which was more than enough for one person.

But I learned almost immediately that while you’re working up the jackfruit, it has an overripe, almost-fetid aroma — sort of like durian light, if you’ve ever smelled that fruity horror.

You can eat the fruit raw and some have made jerky of it, but the texture might seem a little tough for either.

Unless you’re used to it, jackfruit might be best encountered first after sauteing it. In this way,  it can be used in both savory and sweet dishes.

Jackfruit Barbecue

Jackfruit Barbecue

For savory dishes, you could try it in your favorite stir-fry as a substitute for tofu or chicken. You could also try it in a vegan barbecue dish. All you have to do is season the fruit with your favorite barbecue rub and saute it for a few minutes. Then cover the fruit with barbecue sauce and let them cook together over a medium to medium-low heat for at least 30 minutes. The end result was supposed to taste like pulled pork — at least to vegans. How many of them have been eating pulled pork lately is anybody’s guess. It certainly looks like pulled pulled in a certain light, but the end result proved to be incredibly sweet, as cooking released the fruit’s natural sugars, but it was also cloy. So, proceed with caution.

Jackfruit cooking in sugar

Jackfruit cooking in sugar

Perhaps you’d prefer to try the fruit in a sweeter context. I first tasted jackfruit back in Port Charlotte, Florida, where a local ice cream maker decided to showcase several flavors of his native land, the Philippines. His menu included a purple sweet potato called ube as well as jackfruit.

To get started on this side of the fruit’s personality, I sauteed it in sugar (4:1 ratio of fruit to sugar) for about 30 minutes. When I was ready to use it, the fruit went into a food processor where it was rendered into a thick puree. I froze most of it, but I used a cup for jackfruit ice cream.

This time, the fruit showed off its best flavors clean and strong. Even a few people who were dubious about trying the ice cream ate their fill after having a taste.

Jackfruit-Peach Ice Cream

1 cup jackfruit puree
1 cup finely chopped fresh peach
1 cup coconut milk
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup sugar

Jackfruit-Peach Ice Cream

Jackfruit-Peach Ice Cream

To make the jackfruit puree, saute 1 cup jackfruit with 1/4 cup sugar for over medium-high heat for about 30 minutes or until soft and a syrup forms in the pan. Cool.

When ready to make the ice cream, puree the jackfruit in a food processor. Chop the peach and add to the jackfruit puree. Chill.

In a saucepan or bowl with a lid, mix coconut milk, cream and sugar, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Stir in the jackfruit mixture. Cover and refrigerate for at least 3 hours or overnight.

Freeze according to ice cream manufacturer’s instructions.

Makes a little more than 1 quart ice cream.

From John Griffin

 

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Botika Opens at the Historic Pearl

Botika Opens at the Historic Pearl

Botika is now open at Pearl.

Botika is now open at Pearl.

Chef Geronimo Lopez has opened Botika, a Peruvian-Asian restaurant, at the Historic Pearl. The menu features Chifa and Nikkei cuisine as well as inventive takes on classic dishes from Asia and Latin America.

Chaufa

Chaufa includes crispy pork belly and sofrito.

 “We have been working so hard and prepping for this day for the last several months,” said Lopez. “We are so thrilled to be welcoming the San Antonio community to our restaurant, and introducing them to this new flavor profile I think the city will really love.”

 Botika’s menu features picaderas like Tuna Tartare and Chifles, Pork Jowl Steamed Buns, and Duck Confit and Potato Salteñas as well as ceviches and tiraditos, like the Al Tumbo, deep-fried ceviche with tamarillo leche de tigre. Sushi rolls include the Costa Roll, with shrimp, crispy rice noodles, and sweet ají sauce, and the Sweet Plantain Uramaki Roll, with green onion, Neufchatel cheese, and spicy ‘crispies’.  Wok selections are led by the savory beef Lomo Saltado and the crispy pork belly Chaufa rice dish.

 The restaurant features an open kitchen and a sushi-ceviche bar with counter seating, plus an inviting cocktail lounge area with vibrant ambience. Botika’s cocktail menu includes a variety of sakes, rums, piscos, and cachaças. Cocktail selections include the Batucada (cachaça, lime, sugar, angostura), Güenazo Cooler (sake, canton, yuzu, lime, mint), Piscolero 101 (pisco, chicha morada, lemon, tonic), and more.

Piscolero 101

Piscolero 101

“Pearl couldn’t be more excited to be home to a groundbreaking restaurant concept for San Antonio,” said Shelley Grieshaber, culinary director at Pearl. “Chef Lopez’s interpretation of Peruvian-Asian cuisine is unique to this city. The flavors are an intricate blend of familiar and exotic, and the atmosphere is vibrant and fun. Prepare to be transported to a new culinary destination!”

Lopez was most recently the executive chef and an instructor at Culinary Arts at the Culinary Institute of America in San Antonio, where he led the opening of the school’s NAO restaurant (now Nao Latin Gastro Bar).  Including his home country of Venezuela, he has led the kitchen at top restaurants and resorts in six countries over the past 20 years.

 Botika, 303 Pearl Parkway, is open right now Monday through Saturday, 5 to 11 p.m. Extended hours, lunch service, and late night dining hours will be announced in the upcoming months. Due to limited initial opening hours, reservations are encouraged and can be made by calling 210-951-9393 or by visiting botikapearl.com.

Sweet Plantain Uramaki Roll at Botika

Sweet Plantain Uramaki Roll at Botika

There are several dining areas to choose from at Botika.

The interior of Botika

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Big Red Cake. Of Course.

Big Red Cake. Of Course.

Big Red Cake

Big Red Cake

If you live in the San Antonio area long enough, you’ll come to know that Big Red has seeped into the culinary fabric of the city in a big way. It’s easy to see why. In addition to its pleasant vanilla flavor, it’s bright red color and over-the-top level of caffeine make it a genuine eye-opener on several levels.

It's a poke cake, so poke it good.

It’s a poke cake, so poke it good.

Needless to say, Big Red has been adapted for uses beyond merely drinking with barbacoa on weekend mornings.

One way is this Big Red Cake, the recipe for which I found in the 1991 “Market Trail Heritage Cookbook,” a collection from a number of cities in and around San Antonio, including Hondo, Castroville, D’Hanis, Pearsall, Devine, Somerset and more. I knew the book was a treasure when I saw this recipe from someone named Thelma Ramirez, who has combined a number of favorites, including the ever-popular poke cake, into one outrageous treat.

It’s not just a poke cake. There’s a layer of pudding on top, then it’s capped off with Cool Whip and finally fresh fruit. (That makes it healthy, right?)

I made a few variations to the original when I tried it. I made the box cake with melted butter instead of oil, milk instead of water, an added egg and a splash of vanilla, all of which helped create a more homemade richness to the cake mix. I also used blueberries instead of strawberries on top, because it’s the Fourth of July weekend and I wanted a red, white and blue cake to help celebrate.

Big Red Cake

1 box yellow cake mix
1 (6-ounce) box strawberry-flavored gelatin
12 ounces Big Red, cold
1 (3.4-ounce) box instant vanilla pudding
1 (8-ounce) tub Cool Whip
Fresh strawberries or blueberries

Prepare cake mix as directed and bake in a 9-by-13-inch pan. Let cool.

Make the cake however you want to. I changed a few ingredients to make it denser.

Make the cake however you want to. I changed a few ingredients to make it denser.

Mix the strawberry gelatin with 1 cup of hot water and the cold Big Red. Poke holes in the cake and pour the gelatin mixture evenly over the cake. Pour the entire mixture over the top. The cake will eventually absorb all of the liquid. Let it set for at least 30 minutes.

See the air bubble? It takes time for the cake to absorb all of the Big Red-gelatin liquid.

See the air bubble? It takes time for the cake to absorb all of the Big Red-gelatin liquid.

Prepare the vanilla pudding according to the directions on the box and spread evenly over the cake. (If you are making this ahead, cover the cake with plastic wrap and refrigerate.)

Cover it with vanilla pudding and let it set until you're ready to eat. This looks so good, I think I'm ready to eat now.

Cover it with vanilla pudding and let it set until you’re ready to eat. I’m ready now.

When you’re ready to serve, spread the Cool Whip over the top and garnish with fresh strawberries. If you want a red, white and blue look, use blueberries on top.

Cool Whip covers any imperfections below it.

Cool Whip covers any imperfections below it.

Add blueberries, strawberries or your favorite berry.

Add blueberries, strawberries or your favorite berry.

Makes 1 cake.

Adapted from Thelma Ramirez/”Market Trail Heritage Cookbook”

 

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Enjoy a Make-Ahead Salad Filled with Freshness

Enjoy a Make-Ahead Salad Filled with Freshness

tomato saladA friend recently went through a lifetime of cookbooks and gave me 11 cases to go through. Needless to say, it’s going to take some time, especially when I pause all the time to read through a recipe for this or that.

I’m not going to keep all of them, of course. After all, there are a few duplicates in there. But you never know where you’re going to find a treasure. The following recipe for Green Pepper, Olive and Tomato Salad comes from “Pantry Pleasures,” a fundraiser for the Mercy Hospital Auxiliary in Grand Rapids, Mich. The year the cookbook appeared is a mystery, though my guess would be in the early 1970s.

I was drawn to it because of the freshness of the ingredients, many of which are personal favorites. But the real appeal is that you can make this a day ahead. So, if you know you’re going to be running short on time, here’s one course that you won’t have to worry about.

It’s also easy to play around with the ingredients to suit your tastes. I added an English cucumber. Radishes and cabbage would also be good additions. (If you use red radishes, add them shortly before serving because the color of the skin will run and turn the whole salad pink.)

Green Pepper, Olive and Tomato Salad

2 green peppers, chopped in thin strips or small pieces
1 cup sliced olives (green or black or a combination of both)
3 large tomatoes, cut into wedges or bite-sized pieces
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 large red onion, cut into thin half-rings
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup neutral-flavored oil, such as grapeseed or avocado
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

In a large bowl, mix together peppers, olives, tomatoes, celery, onion, vinegar, oil, salt and pepper. Marinate overnight. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Makes 12-15 servings.

Adapted from “Pantry Pleasures: Mercy Hospital Auxiliary”

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Treat Your 1015s Like Potatoes

Treat Your 1015s Like Potatoes

onion2

Oven-roasted onions make a low-carb substitute for a baked potato.

Baked potatoes are not on a low-carb diet. So, if you have diabetes or eating Paleo, what are you going to have for a side dish to that steak?

 

1015s in the oven

1015s in the oven

The answer is easy, according to “Hullabaloo in the Kitchen II,” a cookbook from the Dallas County Texas A&M University Mothers’ Club.

Use Texas 1015s instead.

These recipes come from former Gov. Rick Perry and use 1015 onions, which were developed by Aggies to showcase the vegetable’s natural sweetness.

The recipe is also a great way to use leftover brisket, should you have any after a barbecue. Later in the cookbook is a vegetarian version stuffed with broccoli and Parmesan cheese.

onion1Lone Star-Style Whole Roasted Onions

4 (14- to 16-ounce) Texas 1015 onions
Olive oil

Place whole, unpeeled onions in as small a baking dish as possible. Drizzle lightly with olive oil. Roast uncovered at 375 degrees. Onions are done when easily pierced with a fork (soft but not mushy), about 1 hour and 15 minutes, depending on size. To serve, cut an X through the top of each onion and squeeze slightly at the bottom so it opens like a baked potato. Season with salt and pepper to taste and garnish with sour cream and chives, or try with your favorite baked potato toppings.

Makes 4 servings.

From “Hullabaloo in the Kitchen II” from the Dallas County Texas A&M University Mothers’ Club

Texas Barbecue Beef-Stuffed Onions

4 Lone Star-Style Whole Roasted Onions without X cut, at room temperature
6 ounces lean deli roast beef or leftover brisket, cut into 1/2-inch squares
1/4 cup barbecue sauce
3 ounces cheddar cheese, grated

Cut a thin slice off the top of the cooked onions. Gently squeeze each onion from the root end (editor’s note: I did the opposite, cutting the root end off and it worked well). Remove center to leave a shell of about 1/2 inch. Finely dice the onion centers. In a medium bowl, toss diced onion with roast beef, barbecue sauce and cheese. Stuff each shell with 1/4 of the mixture or as much as will fill each onion. I sprinkled a little extra cheddar on top. Reheat at 375 degrees until hot, about 15 minutes.

Makes 4 servings.

From “Hullabaloo in the Kitchen II” from the Dallas County Texas A&M University Mothers’ Club

1015 Onions Stuffed with Broccoli

3 Lone Star-Style Whole Roasted Onions without X cut, at room temperature
1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped broccoli
2/3 cup Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons margarine or butter
2 tablespoons flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup milk
1 (3-ounce) package cream cheese, softened

Peel and cut a thick slice off the top or bottom of the cooked onions. Halve the onions. Remove centers leaving 3/4-inch edges. Chop center portions to equal about 1 cup. Set aside. Cook broccoli according to package directions. Drain. Combine chopped onions, broccoli, Parmesan cheese, mayonnaise and lemon juice. Spoon into centers of onion halves. Place in a casserole dish. Melt margarine in saucepan over medium heat. Blend in flour and salt. Add milk and cook until thick, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and blend in cream cheese. Spoon over onion halves and bake uncovered for 20 minutes at 375 degrees.

Makes 6 servings.

Adapted from “Hullabaloo in the Kitchen II” from the Dallas County Texas A&M University Mothers’ Club

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Give Your Terrine a Texas Twist

Give Your Terrine a Texas Twist

Here’s an easy appetizer recipe that showcases the best of what Texas has to offer, which has come to include goat cheese as well as both black and green olives.

terrine1You can also adapt it to suit your tastes. If you don’t like black olives, double up on the green. Don’t want the green olives stuffed with jalapenos? Then use them with pimentos or anchovies or whatever you like — except for pits, of course.

You have to make this dish ahead of time, which frees you up to attend to other details before your party begins.

Texas Goat Cheese Terrine with Olives

15 ounces fresh goat cheese
3/4 cup heavy cream, or more, as needed
3/4 generous cup jalapeno- terrine2and garlic-stuff green olives, finely chopped
3/4 cup salt- or oil-cured black olives, pitted and finely chopped
Fresh herbs, such as thyme or chives, minced, for garnish (optional)

In a bowl, mix the goat cheese and 3/4 cup heavy cream to make a smooth, rather light spread. If it is too dense, add more cream. Evenly spread 1/4 of the mix across the bottom of an 8-inch square serving dish or bowl. Spread the green olives evenly over the surface of the cheese. Spread another 1/4 of the cheese mixture on top. Sprinkle the black olives evenly over the top. Spread another 1/4 of the cheese mixture on top and flatten it out.

terrine3Use the remaining goat cheese like frosting to spread an even white layer on top.

Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 6 hours before serving. You can do this a day in advance.

Before serving, bring the terrine to room temperature. Sprinkle the herbs on top, if desired.

Serve with your choice of corn chips, pita chips, crackers and celery sticks or other crudites.

Makes 10 servings.

Adapted from “Olives, Anchovies and Capers” by Georgeanne Brennan

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Ghirardelli Brings Its Chocolate to the River Walk

Ghirardelli Brings Its Chocolate to the River Walk

Ghirardelli Chocolate Company has opened a store at the Shops at Rivercenter, 849 E. Commerce St.

Ultimate Double Chocolate Cookies

Ultimate Double Chocolate Cookies

It features chocolate, of course, in the form of gifts as well as a fountain, where guests can enjoy Ghirardelli World Famous Hot Fudge Sundaes, shakes and floats and a full line of espresso beverages.

Store hours are Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, click here.
 
“As we continue to expand our restaurant and retail division, Ghirardelli Chocolate is honored to open our flagship location in Texas, bringing visitors and shoppers an unforgettable, sweet experience,” said Marty Thompson, president and CEO of the Ghirardelli Chocolate Company. “We have been bringing quality chocolate to the public for over 164 years and are excited to continue this tradition in the great state of Texas.”

To celebrate, here’s Ghirardelli’s recipe for Ultimate Double Chocolate Cookies. They’re easy to make and easier to devour.

Ultimate Double Chocolate Cookies
12 ounces Ghirardelli Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips
10 ounces Ghirardelli 60 Percent Cacao Bittersweet Chocolate Chips
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 eggs
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup chopped walnuts
In double boiler over hot water, melt bittersweet chocolate chips and butter. In large bowl with electric mixer or whisk, beat eggs and sugar until thick; stir into chocolate mixture. In small bowl, stir together flour and baking powder; stir into chocolate mixture. Gently mix in semi-sweet chocolate chips and walnuts. Using a sheet of plastic wrap, form dough into two logs, each 2 inches in diameter and about 12 inches long. As dough will be quite soft, use plastic wrap to hold dough in log shape. Wrap tightly; refrigerate at least 1 hour or until firm.

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Unwrap dough; with sharp knife, cut into 3/4 inch slices. Place slices 1 1/2 inches apart on greased or parchment-lined cookie sheet. Bake 12 to 14 minutes or until shiny crust forms on top but interior is still soft. Cool on baking sheet; store in airtight tin up to 1 week.

Makes 2 dozen cookies.

From Ghirardelli Chocolate

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