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Green Chile Pie Is Easy to Adapt to Your Tastes


A recipe is your guideline to great things. Just remember that you don’t have to follow it to the letter. From the moment I read this recipe in “Lone Star Eats,” Terry Thompson-Anderson’s collection of Texas cookbooks, my mouth started watering and I knew I just had to try it.

Green Chile Pie

Green Chile Pie

But I also started thinking of ways to make it my own. Instead of cheddar and Swiss, I wanted to use a colby-Jack blend. Instead of just bacon, I wanted to add shrimp to the mix. I shared the recipe with Bonnie Walker, and she made her own suggestion. She wanted a crust to go with the pie; so, she suggested a layer of corn mush at the bottom to bake with all of that goodness.

The size of casserole dish you use will affect the dish. I used one that was deeper and narrower than a more shallow one, which would allow you to cut it into squares, like the original suggests. It doesn’t matter. Mine was served with a spoon, and people took whatever they wanted, which they ate by itself or with corn chips.

All of these additions or substitutions still respect the original, which comes from “Lagniappe: A Little Something Extra,” produced by the Junior League of Beaumont. So, make it as is, or adapt it to suit your tastes. That’s best of all.

Green Chile Pie

2 (7-ounce) cans green chiles, halved, seeded and drained
10 bacon slices or a mix of bacon and boiled shrimp
1 pound grated cheddar cheese
1/2 pound grated Swiss cheese
6 eggs, beaten
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste
1/2 cup shredded Muenster cheese or queso fresco, crumbled

Line bottom of a 2-quart casserole with green chiles.

Green chilesCook bacon until crisp and drain; crumble into small bits and scatter over the chiles. (If you’re adding boiled shrimp, just peel the shrimp, cut them up and toss with the bacon.)

green chiles bacon and shrimp

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Mix cheddar and Swiss cheeses and combine with beaten eggs, salt and pepper. Pour the mixture over the bacon.

green chiles cheese

Top with the shredded Muenster or queso fresco.

green chiles queso

Bake for 45 to 50 minutes. Cut into squares to serve.

Makes 8 to 10 servings.

Adapted from “Lagniappe: A Little Something Extra” from the Junior League of Beaumont/”Lone Star Eats,” edited by Terry Thompson-Anderson

 

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Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee


“It’s hard to eat just one piece of bacon, one peanut or one little square of chocolate,” write Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama in “Bacon Nation” (Workman Publishing, $14.95). “Combine the three and you don’t have a chance at moderation, so consider yourself warned: If you make this toffee, be prepared to give some away or you will surely eat it all. If you like to make sweets as a holiday gift, add this brittle toffee to your repertoire. While it’s delicious at room temperature, the toffee is wonderful to freeze and then break off a piece after dinner when you want something sweet but you don’t want to commit to a full-on dessert.”

Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee

Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee

Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee

5 slices applewood- or hickory-smoked bacon, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1 1/2 cups lightly salted cocktail peanuts, plus 2 tablespoons chopped lightly salted cocktail peanuts
15 tablespoons (1 3/4 sticks, plus 1 tablespoon) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch-thick pieces, plus butter for greasing the baking pan
1 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
4 ounces 70 percent cacao dark chocolate, finely chopped

Butter a 15-by-10-1-inch nonstick baking pan or line it with a Silpat and place it on a heatproof surface.

Cook the bacon in a medium-size skillet over medium heat until lightly browned and crisp and most of the fat is rendered, 5 to 8 minutes, stirring often and adjusting the heat as necessary. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to drain, reserving the bacon fat in the skillet.

Blot the drained pieces of bacon with paper towels to remove any excess grease. Set aside 3 tablespoons of the bacon pieces. Combine the remaining bacon pieces with the 1 1/2 cups of peanuts in a medium-size bowl.

Pour the bacon fat from the skillet through a wire-mesh strainer set over a small bowl and then place 1 tablespoon of the strained bacon fat in a heavy deep 3- or 4-quart saucepan.

Add the butter and sugar to the saucepan and cook over medium-high heat until the butter is almost melted, less than 1 minute. Then whisk constantly until the sugar is incorporated into the butter and the mixture is smooth, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the vanilla. Attach a candy thermometer securely to the side of the saucepan and let the butter and sugar mixture boil, whisking occasionally, until it is a deep golden and registers 300 degrees on the thermometer.

Remove the saucepan from the heat and immediately stir in the bacon and peanut mixture. Pour the hot toffee mixture carefully into the center of the prepared baking pan. Using a butter knife or metal spatula, spread the toffee mixture so that it covers about two thirds of the surface of the pan and is slightly less than 1/2 inch thick. Let the toffee set for about 30 seconds, then sprinkle the chocolate on top, spreading it out with the butter knife or spatula. Sprinkle the remaining 2 tablespoons of chopped peanuts and the reserved bacon evenly over the top of the toffee and then freeze it until firm, about 30 minutes.

Slip the spatula under the toffee to loosen it from the pan and then break the toffee into pieces. The toffee can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to five days or in the freezer for up to two weeks.

Makes 1 1/2 pounds.

From “Bacon Nation” by Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama

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Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Green Salad


“For this dish we owe a debt of gratitude to the great chef Daniel Bouloud, who is both a friend and a cooking mentor,” write Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama in “Bacon Nation” (Workman Publishing, $14.95). “His simple recipe for pancetta-wrapped tuna loin is supremely flavorful and combines a cracklingly crisp texture on the outside with smooth tuna, cooked rare, on the inside. We once assisted Bouloud when he made it for President Clinton at a dinner in East Hampton, N.Y. We prepared a few extra portions for his Secret Service detail and their looks of delight meant as much as the rave reviews from the commander-in-chief.

Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Salad

Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Salad

“For our version we have gone with a similarly fatty fish — salmon. The result is so good our hope is that we, too, can make it for a president some day. Use thin or medium-thick sliced bacon, as thicker-cut bacons will overwhelm the salmon. Make sure to cook the bacon-wrapped salmon on the stove until the bacon is browned and crisp before putting it into the oven. The salmon does not bake long enough to brown the bacon much more once it leaves the stovetop. Since salmon is a fish many people like to eat rare, and even raw, how long you cook the fish depends on how done you like it. Rare salmon has a deep orange color and looks slightly translucent; medium salmon leans more to pink in color with opaque flesh. An instant-read thermometer will  help you gauge doneness, but with salmon it is best to make a small incision into the thickest part of the fish and take a look.”

Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Green Salad

For the salmon:
7 to 8 slices thin-cut or regular-cut bacon
1 to 1 1/4 pounds skinless salmon fillet, center cut like a roast (9 to 10 inches long, 1 1/2 inches thick at thickest point and 3 inches wide), pin bones removed
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

For the salad:
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Juice of 1 lime (about 1 tablespoon)
1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
4 packed cups baby spinach, rinsed and patted dry
2 loosely packed cups arugula, rinsed and patted dry
1 ripe avocado
1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced

Prepare the salmon: Place a 10- to 12-inch long piece of plastic wrap on a work surface. Arrange the bacon slices side by side on the plastic wrap so that one end of each slice is positioned at the edge of the place wrap nearest you and the slices overlap just a little. Season the salmon very lightly with salt (remember the bacon will add salt) and pepper to taste, and the ginger. Place the salmon across the overlapped slices of bacon, positioning it at one end of the slices. Tuck the thinner end of the salmon under toward the center so the salmon fillet is roughly even in thickness and 7 to 8 inches long from end to end. (You could add a layer of pesto here, if you’d like.) Holding 2 corners of the plastic wrap at one end, roll the bacon around the outside of the salmon fillet, keeping the rows of slices as even as possible. Secure the bacon to the salmon by tying it with butcher’s string or unwaxed dental floss at 1 inch intervals, as you would tie a meat roast. (You can place the string or floss under each strip of bacon at the start, if you prefer.) Wrap the salmon in the plastic wrap and set it aside.

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Heat the 2 teaspoons of olive oil in a large ovenproof pan over medium heat (a cast-iron skillet works well for this) for about 30 seconds. When the oil is hot, remove and discard the plastic wrap from the bacon-wrapped salmon and add the salmon to the pan. Sear the salmon until the bacon is browned and the fat is rendered, about 2 minutes on each of the 4 sides.

Transfer the pan to the oven and bake the salmon for 4 to 5 minutes, then use an instant-read thermometer to test for doneness, inserting it into the thickest part of the salmon. When the salmon is done to rare, it will register 120 to 125 degrees. For medium salmon, cook the fish as few minutes longer until the instant-read meat thermometer registers 130 to 135 degrees. Once you remove the salmon from the oven, tent it lightly with aluminum foil. The internal temperature will rise another 5 degrees as it sits.

Prepare the salad: Places the 3 tablespoons of olive oil, the lime juice and mustard in a small mixing bowl and whisk to mix. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Or put all of the ingredients for the lime and mustard dressing in a small jar, cover it and shake vigorously just before serving.

Place the spinach and arugula on a serving platter. Slice the avocado and scatter it and the red onion on top of the greens.

To serve, transfer the salmon to a cutting board. Remove and discard the string. Cut the salmon into slices about 1-inch thick and arrange them on top of the salad. Whisk or shake the lime and mustard dressing to fully recombine it and drizzle it over the salmon and salad. Serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings.

From “Bacon Nation” by Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama

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Getting to the Meat of the Matter: It’s All About Bacon


Bacon. Any questions?

Yes, quite a few, actually.

Marie Rama knows her bacon.

Marie Rama knows her bacon.

They came from all sides of the bacon-loving audience that gathered at Central Market recently for Marie Rama’s cooking class — and Rama, who co-wrote “Bacon Nation” (Workman Publishing, $14.95) with Peter Kaminsky, was happy to oblige.

She started with the pig as a whole. “All parts of the pig are joyous — and edible,” she said, before launching into a series of dishes from appetizer to dessert that used bacon as a key ingredient.

A Bacon Crumble-Topped Muffin

A Bacon Crumble-Topped Muffin

For her first recipe, she turned bacon into a jam loaded with ginger and bourbon. It would make a great starter or snack with cheese and crackers. Or you could spread it on a hamburger or pork. Or you could just dip a spoon in the jar and enjoy it’s sweet, salty, fruity and hot flavors.

The type of bacon that you use in recipes like this one matters, Rama said. For a jam, you’d want a bacon that’s been smoked with applewood or cherrywood to give it a fruit flavor.

For her Bacon Crumble-Topped Bran Muffins, a thick-cut bacon is preferred for both the muffin base and the topping. But a thin-cut or regular-cut slice would work better for the Bacon Swizzle Stick that’s perfect for your next Bloody Mary.

Marie Rama shows how easy it is to make bacon-flavored toffee.

Marie Rama shows how easy it is to make bacon-flavored toffee.

It also helps to know what you’re buying, she said. Some bacons have water added to pump up the volume and add weight. You might not learn that by reading the label, but you’ll know the first time you try to cook it, she said. So, if it happens to you, remember the label and don’t be fooled again.

Rama likes to examine the bacon for a good proportion of fat to meat. She prefers hers to be about 50/50, but she added quickly that “I don’t have a horse in this race.” She used artisan bacon and commercial bacon alike in creating and testing the recipes for “Bacon Nation.” But she did say that was impressed with the bacon selection she found at Central Market. “Whenever I go into a new city, I always go to the meat market and check out the bacon,” she said. “You’ve got great stuff here.”

Throughout her class, Rama stressed the importance of reserving the bacon grease for using again. Your recipe may call for a tablespoon or two; or you could use those drippings to great effect in any of the following ideas from “Bacon Nation:”

  • Pop popcorn in bacon fat.
  • Make a Caesar salad dressing using bacon drippings instead of olive oil.
  • Fry chicken using four parts peanut oil and one part bacon fat.
  • Use bacon fat to cook refried beans and sunny-side-up eggs.
  • Add bacon fat when boiling water to cook or blanch green beans.

The litany goes on to such an extent that you wish Rama were inviting you over for dinner on a regular basis, just to see what she’s got cooking.

Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee

Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee

Her menu for the cooking class also included a rustic Bacon and Butternut Squash Galette, an open pie that’s easy. “You don’t have to fuss with it too much,” she said.

The pastry crust didn’t call for bacon grease, but Rama did say you could use it in quick breads, corn breads and muffins among other dough recipes, which is why her cookbook includes the likes of Cheddar Cheese and Bacon Biscuits, Bacon and Rosemary Shortbread, and Oyster and Corn Bread Stuffing with Bacon.

Thin- or regular-cut bacon was preferred for Rama’s main course, a Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Green Salad. This recipe was a variation on a dish that celebrity chef Daniel Boulud once created for President Bill Clinton, presumably before he turned vegan. His called for tuna wrapped in pancetta, while Kaminsky and Rama’s uses strips of bacon wrapped around salmon.

The cooking process here take two steps. First, you have to brown the bacon thoroughly in a pan before placing it in the oven. The first step gets the bacon dark and crispy, while the oven cooks the salmon at the center. For this dish, Rama likes to use a cast-iron skillet “for getting a good sear on the bacon,” she said.

Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Salad

Crusted Salmon with Avocado and Red Onion Salad

OK, Rama’s menu was loaded with bacon from start to finish, because that’s what her cookbook is all about. She wouldn’t suggest a whole bacon dinner at home, however. “It’s a little too much,” she said.

When it comes to health matters, bacon really isn’t as bad as some have made it out to be, she said, explaining that only about half of the fat is saturated.

If you needed further proof, consider this: The svelte Rama said she didn’t gain a pound while doing the research and recipe writing for the cookbook.

To close out her class, Rama made a Chocolate-Peanut-Bacon Toffee that elicited more than a few contented sighs from people in the classroom. Think of a more buttery peanut brittle with chocolate and bacon added.

You need to use a candy thermometer for this recipe because the caramel holding the peanuts together (yes, it’s made with bacon drippings) needs to reach about 300 degrees but no more. “Caramelizing is literally bringing it to a burnt state, but you don’t want to go over it or it will burn,” she said.

Welcome to Marie Rama's "Bacon Nation."

Welcome to Marie Rama’s “Bacon Nation.”

Of all the recipes that evening, the bacon in this one was the least pronounced. It seemed to lend more of a salt flavor to the complement the peanuts, while the dark chocolate just carried everything over the top.

But if there’s not enough bacon in it for you, that’s easily remedied.

“You want it with more bacon? Throw some more bacon on it,” Rama said.

It was a philosophy her students were ready to take home and put into action.

Ready to add bacon into more of your dishes? Here are links to Rama’s recipes

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Bacon Crumble-Topped Bran Muffins


“We set out to create a muffin that could be breakfast with the easy addition of a cup of coffee and a glass of juice,” writer Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama in “Bacon Nation” (Workman Publishing, $14.95). “It includes bacon and eggs and super-healthy bran. Fifteen or 20 years ago, bran muffins were flavorless and so gummy that people who felt guilty about their eating habits could take solace in the ‘penance’ of a chewy, tasteless bran muffin. But bran is powerful and assertive, just the thing to stand up to bacon in these muffins. And adding yogurt is like adding the fountain of youth — just look at all those yogurt-eating Bulgarians who live to be 100. With all that healthiness going for these muffins, why not finish them off with a sweet, crumbly bacon topping? Here’s to health and fun!”

Bacon Crumble-Topped Bran Muffins

Bacon Crumble-Topped Muffin with a Virgin Mary and a Bacon Swizzle Stick.

Bacon Crumble-Topped Muffin with a Virgin Mary and a Bacon Swizzle Stick.

For the bacon crumble topping:
2 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
Unsalted butter
6 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons packed light or dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

For the bacon bran muffins:
3 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into 1/4- to 1/2-inch pieces
3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 whole-wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup Kellogg’s All-Bran cereal
2 large eggs
1/3 cup packed light or dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon molasses
3 tablespoons canola oil
1 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
1 1/4 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 cup golden raisins

Prepare the bacon crumble topping: Cook the 2 slices of bacon in a medium-size skillet over medium heat until lightly browned and most of the fat is rendered, 5 to 8 minutes, stirring often and adjusting the heat as necessary. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to drain, reserving 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet. If necessary, add enough butter to the skillet to measure 1 tablespoon.

Combine the 6 tablespoons of flour, the sugar, 2 tablespoons of brown sugar and 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon in a small bowl. Add 2 tablespoons of butter to the skillet with the bacon fat and heat over medium high heat until the butter melts, about 30 seconds. Drizzle the butter and bacon fat mixture over the sugar and flour mixture in the bowl, taking care to include any browned bacon bits from the bottom of the skillet. Add he drained bacon and toss with a fork until evenly moistened. Set the bacon crumble topping side.

Prepare the bacon bran muffins: Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cook the 3 slices of bacon pieces in a medium-size skillet over medium heat until lightly browned and most of the fat is rendered, 5 to 8 minutes, stirring often and adjusting the heat as necessary. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to drain, reserving the bacon fat in the skillet. Using a pastry brush, grease 9 muffin tin cups (a nonstick muffin tin works best) with the bacon fat from the skillet.

Combine the 3/4 cup of flour and the whole-wheat flour, baking soda, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and the salt in a medium-size mixing bowl.

Add 1/2 cup of the bran cereal to the bowl of a mini food processor and pulse until finely ground. Set the ground bran cereal aside. Place the eggs in a second medium-size mixing bowl and whisk until lightly colored, then whisk in the 1/2 cup of brown sugar and the molasses. Add the oil, yogurt and vanilla, and whisk well to combine. Stir in the remaining 1/2 cup of bran cereal, raisins and drained bacon and let the bran mixture sit for about 5 minutes.

Add the flour mixture to the bran mixture and mix with a rubber spatula until the batter is combined and evenly moistened. The batter will be a little stiff; do not overmix it. Using a 13 cup measure, divide the batter evenly among the 9 greased muffin cups. Top each muffin with about 2 tablespoons of the bacon crumble topping.

Bake the muffins until a cake tester inserted into the center of one comes out clean, 16 to 18 minutes. Let the muffins cool in the muffin tin for about 5 minutes, then transfer the muffins to a wire rack and let cool for about 5 minutes longer before serving.  The bran muffins can be stored in an airtight container for 3 to 4 days.

Makes 9 muffins.

From “Bacon Nation” by Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama

 

 

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Bacon Jam


“If anyone were to rank recipes by how much flavor you get compared to how much time they take to make, we think this one would be in the running for Most Flavor Per Minute,” write Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama in “Bacon Nation” (Workman Publishing, $14.95). Bacon Jam combines almost all the flavor giants into one dish: saltiness, meatiness, sweetness, peppery heat, bright acidity and fruitiness. It makes a wonderful condiment for hamburgers or grilled steak. It’s great with cream cheese on a toasted bagel. And the next time you serve an appetizer platter of assorted cheeses, be sure to include a bowl of Bacon Jam. Your guests will love a spoonful of it atop a slice of goat cheese or Brie. The recipe is really no more than a road map that you should feel free to adjust according to your taste. We like it hot and spicy but it’s delicious without jalapeños. When serving the jam with spareribs or grilled chicken, try rosemary instead of ginger. Bourbon has just the right amount of sweet, smooth smokiness that complements bacon so well, although a really peaty Scotch is worth a try, too.

Bacon Jam with cheese and crackers

Bacon Jam with cheese and crackers

Bacon Jam

1/2 pound (8-9 slices) applewood- or cherrywood-smoked bacon, sliced crosswise into 1/2 inch-wide pieces
1 medium-sized shallot, diced (about 1/4 cup)
1 teaspoon seeded and chopped jalapeño pepper
1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
2 tablespoons bourbon
3 pieces peeled fresh ginger, each about the size and thickness of a quarter
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon honey
Freshly ground black pepper
Crackers and assorted cheeses (optional), for serving

Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until browned and crisp and the fat is rendered, 7 to 10 minutes, stirring often and adjusting the heat as necessary. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to drain, reserving 1 to 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat in the skillet.

Add the shallot and jalapeño to the skillet and cook over medium-low heat until the shallot is softened, about 2 minutes, stirring often and scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the skillet. Return the bacon to the skillet and add the brown sugar, cider vinegar, orange juice, bourbon, ginger and bay leaf. Cover the skillet and let come to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer gently, uncovered, until most of the liquid has evaporated, 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Remove and discard the bay leaf. Transfer the bacon mixture to a mini food processor and pulse until the bacon is finely diced but not puréed, 10 to 15 times, pausing several times to scrape down the side of the bowl.

Place the Bacon Jam in a small bowl and stir in the honey and a couple of grindings of black pepper. Serve with crackers and assorted cheese, if desired. The jam can be refrigerated, covered, for up to 1 week.

Makes about 1/2 cup.

From “Bacon Nation” by Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama

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Spice Up Your Bloody Mary with a Bacon Swizzle Stick


Having a brunch this holiday weekend? Add a lively touch to your Bloody Mary with a bacon swizzle stick. It’s simple to make, and it incorporates bacon in a novel way into the meal.

A Virgin Mary with a Bacon Swizzle Stick is great with brunch.

A Virgin Mary with a Bacon Swizzle Stick is great with brunch.

This is the creation of Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama, authors of “Bacon Nation” (Workman Publishing, $14.95). Rama was in San Antonio recently to spread the gospel of bacon, and she demonstrated the ease of making them during a cooking class at Central Market.

In the bacon-filled cookbook, the authors write about the development of this culinary marvel: “Most swizzle sticks do one thing well: They swizzle. One evening we invited our friend Richard Bonomo over to enjoy a cocktail and taste a few of our newly tested bacon recipes. Richard, a chemist and avid cook helped us find a way to make a bacon swizzle stick hold its spiral shape by wrapping it in a paper towel before popping it in the microwave. Sometimes it really helps to have a scientist in the kitchen. The swizzle sticks are great with Bloody Marys, martinis and planter’s punch. Keep experimenting. It’s fun.”

Bacon Swizzle Stick

Arrange a slice of bacon diagonally on top of a piece of paper towel. Holding the slice of bacon at each end, twist the slice in opposite directions into a tight spiral. Fold the paper towel in half over the twisted bacon slice so that the towel’s opposite corners meet. Then, starting at the fold, roll the paper towel under the palms of your hands, around the bacon into a tube. Microwave the bacon in its rolled paper towel on high power until it is firm and shaped like a swizzle stick, about 1 minute and 15 seconds. Because microwave ovens vary in power, check for doneness in about about 1 minute. Unroll the paper towel and let the swizzle stick cool before using it as a garnish for your favorite Bloody Mary or Virgin Mary.

The recipe makes 1 swizzle stick, can be multiplied as desired.

From “Bacon Nation” by Peter Kaminsky and Marie Rama

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