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Tag Archive | "Jessica B. Harris"

Greens Mineira Style (Couve a Mineira)


Today is said to be National Kale Day, not that anybody needs a holiday to enjoy this green, which has become trendy recently. Kale soups and salads have cropped up on local menus. And cooked greens, such as this recipe, are always welcome.

This recipe comes from Jessica B. Harris’ “Beyond  Gumbo: Creole Fusion Food from the Atlantic Rim” (Simon & Schuster, $27), and it can be traced to the Brazilian region of Minas Gerais, where it’s usually served with the stew known as feijoada. But, as Harris points out, “for people looking for a new way with green vegetables, it becomes a vegetable dish. Traditionally prepared with young kale, this can also be prepared with broccoli rabe or green cabbage. My favorite way, though, is with collard greens, which become wonderfully green and cook rapidly.”

Greens Mineira Style (Couve a Mineira)

2 pounds fresh young kale
3 tablespoons pure olive oil
1 medium onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
Hot  sauce

Wash the kale thoroughly and bunch together. Take each bunch, roll it tightly and cut it crosswise into thin strips. Wash the strips and drain them thoroughly. Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat and cook the onion and garlic, stirring them until they are lightly browned. Add the kale strip sand cook, stirring for 5 minutes. The greens should be soft, but retain their bright green color. Serve hot, with the hot sauce of your choice.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

From “Beyond Gumbo” by Jessica B. Harris

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Use Collards to Make Brazilian Greens


Collard greens

“In the 21st century, we have learned that not all greens are cooked with bacon drippings and a ham hock,” Jessica B. Harris writes with no small part of her tongue firmly planted in cheek in her new book, “High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America” (Bloomsbury, $26). “This is the way that they accompany feijoada, the national dish of Brazil. The greens may be kale or collards or a mix, but I prefer to use the collards.”

You can serve the greens alongside anything from beef and pork to chicken and fish. Present them with orange or tangelo slices for a beautiful array of colors and flavors.

I made a variation of this dish shortly after visiting Brazil, using kale. It is the only time I can remember my father asking for seconds of anything I ever cooked.

Collards and kale are both are in season, and you’ll find them at your local farmers market right now.

Brazilian Greens

2 pounds fresh young collard greens
3 tablespoons olive oil
8 cloves garlic, or to taste, minced
1 to 2 tablespoons water
Hot sauce, to taste

Wash the collard greens thoroughly and bunch leaves together. Take the bunch, roll it tightly, and cut it crosswise into thin strips. (This is a method that the French call en chiffonade.) Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat, then cook the garlic, stirring over medium heat, then cook the garlic, stirring it until it’s only slightly browned. Add the collard strips and cook them, stirring constantly for 5 minutes, so that the greens are soft but retain their bright color. Add a tablespoon or  two of water, cover, lower the heat and continue to cook for 2 minutes. Serve hot with the hot sauce of your choice.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

From “Tasting Brazil”/”High on the Hog” by Jessica B. Harris

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Julie Tronchet Masson’s Okra Gumbo


Put on a steaming pot of gumbo for Mardi Gras.

“Julie Tronchet Masson was the ancestor of my friend Lou Costa, who has the distinction of being a descendant of one of New Orleans’ oldest families,” Jessica B. Harris writes in “Beyond Gumbo: Creole Fusion Food from the Atlantic Rim” (Simon & Schuster, $27). “This version of gumbo is one of the treasured family recipes that Lou and his family whip up when they entertain in their glorious antique-filled house that used to be a Freedman’s Bureau. I’ve spent many an evening there, sitting on a stool in the kitchen chopping and helping out.”

Get your family to pitch in and do likewise to create this Creole favorite.

Julie Tronchet Masson’s Okra Gumbo

1 1/2 pounds okra
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
3/4 pound ham, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 1/2 pounds medium to large shrimp
1 pound lump crabmeat, picked over
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
White rice, for serving

Slice the okra and place in a heavy Dutch oven with the oil. Fry for 20 minutes or until all stickiness is gone. Add the onion, garlic and ham, and cook for 5 minutes, or until the onions are wilted but not browned. Add the shrimp and crabmeat and 2 cups of water. Cook for 15 minutes and add salt and pepper. Cook for an additional 10 minutes. Serve hot over white rice.

Makes 6 servings.

From “Beyond Gumbo: Creole Fusion Food from the Atlantic Rim” by Jessica B. Harris

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