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Tag Archive | "“Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables”"

Green Beans Made Easier


green beansGreen beans have always been easy to make. But thanks to Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart, the process just got easier.

Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables v2The authors of “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” (Gibbs Smith, $25) have simplified one step that will make your beans look as good as they taste: Instead of dunking your steaming hot beans into an ice bath in order to keep their color, as most recipes call for, all you have to do is run them under some cold water.

You can learn more vegetable tips from Dupree and Cynthia Graubart at this year’s San Antonio Book Fair. Their demonstration is set for 10 a.m. April 2 at the Central Market Cooking Tent at the Central Library Plaza on Augusta Street. A signing will follow.

Once you’ve got those green beans cooked up, follow the authors’ suggested variations, adding flavors and textures to make your favorite standby vegetable new and delicious. Of course, I’d add bacon to the list, too. After all, it’s considered a vegetable to some.

Green Beans

1 pound green beans, tipped, tailed and stringed
2 tablespoons butter or oil
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Bring enough salted water to a boil to cover the beans. Add the beans and return to the boil. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 5 to 7 minutes, utnil the beans are no longer raw but still crisp. Drain and run under cold water to fresh and set the color. The beans may be made a day ahead and refrigerated or frozen at this point.

When ready to serve, heat the butter or oil to sizzling in a large frying pan. Add the beans and toss until heated through. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

2016_SABF_POSTERVariations:

–Top the hot beans with tomato conserve or warm tomato sauce.

–Toss with 1/2 cup pecan halves.

–Saute 1 pound of quartered or sliced mushrooms along with 4 chopped shallots or scallions in 4 tablespoons butter or oil for 1 or 2 minutes. Add the cooked green beans to the mushrooms and reheat. Add a tablespoon of chopped fresh herbs if desired.

–Toss with the grated rind of 1 lemon, no white attached.

–Toss with 1 teaspoon ground cumin or coriander seed and 1/2 teaspoon sugar.

–Toss with 2 tablespoons sesame seeds or chipped pecans.

–Toss hot drained beans with a vinaigrette. Toss just before serving. Serve warm or at room temperature.

–Toss green beans with a mix of sliced roasted cherry, grape or small tomatoes, and add sliced green or black olives, sauteed pecans and/or crumbled goat cheese or other soft white cheese.

Makes 4 servings.

From “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

 

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Yes, You Can Squeeze Flavor from a Spring Turnip


Turnips get a bad wrap. Most of us only know them as these oversized, rock-hard roots that you couldn’t squeeze a drop of water from.

turnips and red peppersYet if you can find turnips at a farmers market, give them a chance. They taste very little like their larger cousins, which Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart call “storage turnips” in their new “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” (Gibbs Smith, $25). The two will be discussing their book at this year’s San Antonio Book Fair. Their demonstration is set for 10 a.m. April 2 at the Central Market Cooking Tent at the Central Library Plaza on Augusta Street. A signing will follow.

“Turnips meld well with bell peppers and make a striking contrast that is particularly good with quail and turkey,” they write. “This may be made ahead a day or so and reheated.”

They also recommend storing spring turnips for no more than a few days, while those so-called storage turnips will last a few weeks.

One nice feature of Dupree and Graubart’s recipes is that they include variations to show you how versatile these vegetables can be.

Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables v2 This helped when testing the recipe. I had enough turnips on hand, but not enough red peppers, so I added a small golden delicious apple as the variation suggested. It worked perfectly with apple and red pepper both in the blend. And the dish was even more attractive with its blend of red, green and white. But flavor that is the real bottom line, and this recipe tastes so good that it’s a keeper. I would also serve it with pork chops, roasted chicken and maybe even a hearty fish, such as halibut or flounder.

Turnips and Red Peppers

1 pound red bell peppers
1 pound small white turnips, peeled
3 to 6 tablespoons butter, divided use
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

turnipsCore, seed and slice the peppers. Cut the peeled turnips into quarters if the turnips are golf-ball size, or into eights if the turnips are larger. (Smaller young turnips can skip the next step.) Add larger turnips to a pot of boiling water and cook for a few minutes to blanch; drain.

Meanwhile, melt 3 tablespoons of butter in a frying pan, and add the peppers, young turnips or parboiled larger turnips and the garlic. Cook over medium heat until the turnips are tender when pierced with a knife and peppers are still crunchy; add more butter if necessary. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Variation: Turnips and Apples

Substitute any firm cooking apple for the peppers. Cut into wedges, leaving skin on and proceed as above.

Makes 4 servings.

From “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

 

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Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetable Salads


Cooks in the South have definite ideas about vegetables — and they aren’t always correct, no matter how tasty their creations are. Often the term is confused with side dishes, so you’ll find restaurant menus with something like macaroni and cheese listed among the vegetable options. Tasty, to be sure, but hardly a vegetable.

Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables v2So, don’t go to Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart’s “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” (Gibbs Smith, $25) expecting to find a host of side dish recipes. Instead, the authors have followed up their definitive “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” with a sharper focus on the rich bounty of vegetables from throughout the region and how to prepare them in traditional ways your family will love.

The authors will present a free talk on their book during this year’s San Antonio Book Festival. It’s set for 10 a.m. April 2 at the Central Market Cooking Tent at the Central Library Plaza on Augusta Street. A signing will follow.

2016_SABF_POSTERIn the introduction, the writers claim, “We traveled all over the South and enjoyed seeing how and where its vegetables are grown. We ate tomatoes from the hills of western North Carolina and ripe melons from the sandy fields of southern Georgia. The Georgia commissioner of agriculture loaned us his plane, and we loaded its storage area with zucchini, squash and Vidalia onions to take home.” And on they go to include sivvy beans, Jerusalem artichokes, sweet potatoes, white potatoes, peanuts and cucumbers.

Great stuff, unless you’re one of those sticklers who would categorize tomatoes, squash, zucchini, melons, cucumbers and all other foods with seeds as fruit.

Does that matter? Hardly. Faced with this trove of great recipes, you’ll discover flavors that could conjure images from your childhood or enlighten you about how good turnips, butter beans, collard greens with “pot likker” or fried ramps can be.

I headed for the kitchen shortly after opening the book in order to make three salads, all of which came together easily and yet offered bold, rewarding flavors that made me want to revisit them again a few days later. In the next week, we’ll be running more recipes from “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” in addition to those below.

To read more about Dupree and Graubart’s “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” and to find an exceptional biscuit recipe, click here.

Traditional Coleslaw

Traditional Coleslaw

Traditional Coleslaw

“The diversity in coleslaw comes from the size of the cabbage pieces,” write Dupree and Graubart. “It’s very finely machine chopped for cafeterias and schools, and we’ve all gotten to like it on top of barbecue on a bun. Halved and quartered before slicing thickly, makes it more rustic and adds a homemade feeling, sort of “grandmother loves me.” And sliced thinly is like a gourmet chef is coming in your kitchen. Using commercial mayonnaise enables making this dish several days in advance. Some people salt, rise and drain the cabbage before using, to reduce the tendency of the cabbage to release water.

“Homemade mayonnaise is discouraged in all slaw recipes because it is easily diluted as the cabbage weeps. This dilutes the acid in the mayonnaise, which acts as a preservative for the egg in the mayonnaise. In a commercial mayonnaise product, the eggs are processed and therefore still have preservative properties.”

4 pounds green or red cabbage, sliced, grated or shredded
2 Vidalia or other sweet onions, finely chopped
1 1/2 cups mayonnaise, preferably store-bought
Dijon mustard
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Cider vinegar

Toss the cabbage with the onions and mayonnaise; taste. Add mustard, salt and pepper as desired. Add a little cider vinegar for a zesty flavor.

Variations:
–Add grated carrots.
–Add a bit of hot red pepper.–Crown with chopped salted peanuts.

Makes 10 to 15 servings.

From “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

cucumber saladRoberta’s Tomatoes and Cucumbers

“Roberta O’Neill Salma and I worked together when we were young women, and we’ve kept our friendship alive,” Dupree writes. “She is a painter and she makes simple ingredients look like art, her food tasting as good as it looks. Her husband shops for the fruit and vegetables and is very picky. Salt brings out the liquid in the tomatoes, making a mouthwatering tomato juice. Omit the vinegar if the tomatoes are ripe and juicy.”

2 pounds ripe tomatoes, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1-2 teaspoons salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup finely chopped fresh basil or parsley
Up to 1/4 cup red wine vinegar, if needed
2 pounds cucumbers, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil or other fresh herbs, optional

Sprinkle the tomatoes well with salt and pepper, and toss with the herbs. cover and leave 1 hour or up to 2 days to extrude the juices. Taste and add vinegar if necessary.

Sprinkle the cucumbers with salt and let sit in a colander over the sink for 30 minutes. Rinse well and drain. Stir inot the tomatoes. Add chopped herbs if using, stir, and pour into a serving bowl.

Variation: Add a few thin slices of red onion.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

From “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

 

celery saladCelery and Olive Salad

“Frequently used only as an accent in salads, soups and stews, celery is overlooked as a vegetable,” Dupree and Graubart write. “It can step into service nicely, particularly when the storage bin is bare.”

1-2 ribs celery,
2-3 Kalamata or French black olives
2–3 tablespoons olive oil, divided use
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Remove tough celery strings with a knife or scrape off with a peeler. Place the celery rib flat side down and slice on the diagonal as thinly as possible.

Cut the olives off the pit and in small pieces. Toss together with 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil, adding more oil as needed. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve chilled.

Variation: Add 1 teaspoon grated orange rind, no white attached.

Makes 2 servings.

From “Mastering the Art of Southern Vegetables” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

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