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Paella’s a Dish You Can Make to Suit Your Tastes


Food lovers watch Zach Lutton (center) and an assistant create a massive paella with plenty of seafood in it.

Food lovers watch Zach Lutton (center) and an assistant create a massive paella with plenty of seafood in it.

Making a good paella is all about layering the flavors you have, which could be anything from lobster and clams to chicken and chorizo. Then there’s the sofrito, an aromatic mixture of garlic, tomatoes, peppers and onions cooked in olive oil, as well as saffron and rice.

Zach Lutton of Zedric's adds a prawn to his paella.

Zach Lutton of Zedric’s adds a prawn to his paella.

But the key ingredient, in Zach Lutton’s opinion, is the stock.

That’s what the owner of Zedric’s Healthy Gourmet to Go believes, and it’s what he says helped him win second place in last year’s Paella Challenge at the Pearl Brewery. This year’s challenge is Sunday, and Lutton will be back, hoping to move up to first place. To give himself a warmup and promote the event, he offered a demonstration of how to make the Spanish dish during a recent Pearl Farmers Market. If the reaction of the crowd is any indication, his bounteous tray topped with heads-on prawns, mussels, clams, baby octopi, chorizo, peas, red bell peppers and even some lemon halves should keep him in the running.

“The stock is the most important ingredient in the whole dish,” he said, adding that he had made his with both lobster bodies and chicken.  “It is the flavor of the paella.”

But that doesn’t mean you’re home free if you’ve got good stock. Paella takes practice, Lutton said.

“This isn’t a quick thing,” he told the crowded class during his cooking demonstration. “Take your time with it. Practice it a few times.”

To begin, decide the ingredients you are going to use. Start with the rice, which should be short grain, such as Bomba, not arborio, which is the rice used in risotto. If chicken is on the list, brown it in some olive oil at the bottom of the pan, but don’t cook it through. You can remove it and use the oil base to make your sofrito, though Lutton doesn’t. He slow cooks his for two hours and lets it rest over night.

But this the time to add it to the pan. Then the rice goes in and each grain gets coated. This is the point when the chicken returns to the pan as well as the chorizo, followed by the stock. Again, this is not risotto, so you don’t stir and stir until each last drop of stock has been absorbed. In fact, you don’t stir the dish at all as it cooks over the heat. But you do need to watch it. After 15 minutes or so, “when you see the rice coming up and the liquid disappearing, you’re headed in the right direction,” the chef said.

Zach Lutton dishes up paella.

Zach Lutton dishes up paella.

Be careful that too much liquid doesn’t disappear or you could burn your paella. Expert paella makers want a crusty bottom, which is also known as socarrat, but no one wants it burned. And Lutton advised beginners not to worry about that. He admitted that he doesn’t pay attention to that when he’s making paella, though it is one of the categories paellas are judged on in competitions.

He was more concerned about getting the seasoning right. Paella is a subtle dish, so a strong spice such as saffron has to be used judiciously. “Don’t add too much saffron, because it can overpower the dish,” he said. He limits his other seasonings to salt and pepper.

Shortly before the broth had been absorbed, Lutton and his assistants added the seafood to the top, again not stirring the mixture. Instead, they planted the bottom of the shellfish into the rice mixture, so the heat could cook them, allowing the mussels and clams to open. The enormous prawns were set in a ring at the center, while the baby octopi were arranged in a ring around the outside. Peas and red peppers were sprinkled on top, adding color as well as flavor.

The entire pan was then covered in aluminum foil so it could rest before serving. The crowd was getting a little hungry, waiting for a sample. “I promise y’all’ll eat soon,” he said with a chuckle. “Just give me about 10 more minutes.”

Tenting the pan allowed the steam to cook any of the seafood above the rice. It also released an enticing aroma that had people eager to try a dish, which Lutton and one of his assistants spooned up in generous amounts, making sure people could taste whatever they wanted from the array of meats that had been included.

Only Lutton seemed to find fault with the paella, which he said was slightly soupy. “But it’s still good, no matter what,” he added. “That stock is awesome.”

Zach Lutton's paella

Zach Lutton’s paella

If you want to make your own paella, be aware that proportions vary depending on the size of the pan used. Pans run in size from 7 1/2 inches to those more than several feet wide. Your best bet is to find a recipe, such as Leslie Horne’s for Texas Quail, Chorizo and Mushroom Paella, which was created for a 15-inch paella and serves about six people. You can find paella pans and burners at GauchoGourmet, 935 Isom Road, and Melissa Guerra Tienda de Cocina in the Pearl Brewery, 312 Pearl Parkway.

You can also make paella any way you like. In Spain, you might find some cooks using pasta instead of rice. You could use only vegetables or only seafood, eliminate the seafood entirely or add what you have in the freezer.

I judged a non-traditional paella challenge in Austin last fall alongside James Canter, the chef who won last year’s Paella Challenge. We tasted a Hawaiian paella seasoned with jamaica, or hibiscus flowers, and another topped with fried eggs and avocado in a ranchero style. One team offered a chicken tinga paella with radishes and cotija cheese. There was even a dessert paella, which was actually more like rice pudding. The winner was a soul food paella made with pig’s feet, ham hocks and chicken gizzards among an array of down-home ingredients. The pictures below illustrate that the type of paella you make is bounded only by your own imagination.

For information on the fourth annual Paella Challenge, click here.

Paella Ranchero

Paella Ranchero

Soul Food Paella

Soul Food Paella

A Hawaiian paella with shrimp, pineapple, artichokes and hibiscus rice.

A Hawaiian paella with shrimp, pineapple, artichokes and hibiscus rice.

Chicken Tinga Paella

Chicken Tinga Paella

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Leslie Horne Dishes Up Texas Quail, Chorizo and Mushroom Paella


Leslie Horne makes paella.

Leslie Horne makes paella.

Leslie Horne of Aurelia’s Chorizo knows her way around a paella pan.

Last fall, she gave several demonstrations at GauchoGourmet on Isom Road, using products in the store to create a dish that was loaded with a cornucopia of flavors. She also cooked up several enormous pans, featuring her chorizo and a host of other succulent ingredients, at Paella Lovers United, an Austin cook-off that drew hundreds to what is essentially a backyard get-together complete with prizes for those interested in competing. (Horne was not part of the competition.)

Once you get the knack of the dish, you’ll discover that you can make paella any way you like. Here’s a recipe that features her chorizo as well as that Texas favorite, quail. What makes it different is that it calls for no seafood. But if you love shrimp, include them in the recipe. Just don’t add them too early or they’ll overcook.

That’s all part of the fun of learning how to make this Spanish favorite. You can make it your own.

Texas Quail, Chorizo and Mushroom Paella

6 cups chicken broth
1/4 teaspoon crumbled saffron threads
6 Texas quail (we love Diamond H brand)
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Smoked Spanish paprika
1/4 cup olive oil
1 onion, finely diced
1 red bell pepper, chopped
3 links Aurelia’s Spanish Style Chorizo, sliced into 1/4-inch thick sliced (see note)
8 ounces white mushrooms, sliced
1 medium tomato, grated or finely diced
6 garlic cloves, minced
4 tablespoons minced flat-leaf parsley
3 cups short grain rice
2 cups green peas
Roasted red pepper strips for garnish
Caper berries, for garnish

Leslie Horne's paella at GauchoGourmet.

Leslie Horne’s paella at GauchoGourmet.

Combine chicken broth and saffron in large pot and heat to almost boiling. (Do not let it boil, or it will evaporate.) Season quail with salt, freshly ground black pepper and smoked Spanish paprika. In a 15-inch paella pan, over 2 burners, heat olive oil. Brown quail, but do not cook through. Remove from pan and set aside. Add onion and bell pepper, cooking until onion is wilted and translucent. Add chorizo and mushrooms, cook for 2 minutes. Add tomato, garlic and parsley. Continue to cook, stirring frequently, until mushrooms begin to soften and garlic becomes aromatic. Add 3 cups rice; stir to coat with pan drippings. Return quail to pan. Carefully add the hot saffron chicken broth. Taste and adjust the salt, if needed. Bring the stock to a boil, cook for 15 minutes rotating pan over two burners. Scatter peas evenly over entire pan but do not stir. Garnish the top of paella with strips of roasted red peppers and caper berries. Cook for an additional 5 minutes or until all broth has been absorbed. Turn off heat. Cover with foil or a clean towel and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Serve and enjoy.

Note: Mexican-style chorizo cannot be substituted in this recipe.

Makes 6 servings.

From Leslie Horne/Aurelia’s Chorizo

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Paella Demonstrations at GauchoGourmet Rescheduled


Leslie Horne will demonstration how to make paella. (Photo: Julia Celeste)

Have you ever wanted to learn how to make great paella at home? Leslie Horne of Aurelia’s Chorizo will be offering a demonstration of the Mediterranean favorite Oct. 20 at GauchoGourmet, 935 Isom Road.

There will be two sessions, at 10 a.m. and noon. The date of the demonstrations has been rescheduled to Oct. 20.

The classes include demonstrations as well as plenty of time to ask questions.

Plus, GauchoGourmet has the pans you’ll need in various sizes and many of the ingredients to make a great paella at home.

The cost is $10 per person. For reservations, call (210) 277-7930.

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Ask A Foodie: Got a Good Paella Recipe?


Create your own paella with the flavors and ingredients you prefer.

Q. Looking for a good paella recipe to make this weekend. Do you know of any? Thanks.

—Terry

A. You can make paella a host of different ways, as the recent Paella Challenge at the Pearl Brewery demonstrated. You can use any cut of pork, Thai curry or crawfish, if you choose. Let your imagination run wild.

I prefer at least to build on a traditional recipe that reminds of when I first had paella. I was in Barcelona back in high school. It had a number of ingredients I don’t remember ever having had before, including squid, saffron, chorizo and artichokes. Rice was about all I recognized, but I loved the dish from the first bite.

I wish I had my host’s recipe, but the closest I’ve found is Janet Mendel’s Paella with Seafood from “Tapas and More Great Dishes from Spain,” a much-used cookbook I picked up in Spain on a subsequent visit. Her version is a good template that you can alter to suit your personal tastes. I would use chorizo, for example, and probably substitute more shrimp and scallops for the squid, simply because I’ve never cooked with squid. (Why, I don’t know.) I’d also use clams instead of mussels. I also like to garnish the dish with some fresh green herbs, such as cilantro or parsley.

That sounds like a lot of substitutions, but it is still built on a great base of rice with saffron and seafood stock, chicken, vegetables including peas and artichokes as well as green bell pepper and roasted red pepper.

Paella with Seafood (Paella con Mariscos)

1 dozen mussels, scrubbed and steamed open
1 pound large or jumbo, uncooked shrimp
6 tablespoons olive oil
2 pounds chicken or rabbit, cut in small pieces
10 ounces squid, cleans and cut in rings
2 small green peppers, diced
2 large tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 1/2 ounces peas or broad beans or green beans or quartered artichokes (par-boil beans or artichokes)
6 1/2 cups water or stock
1 pound Spanish short-grain rice
1/2 teaspoon saffron (or more for a bright yellow color)
Crushed peppercorns or freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 teaspoons salt
1 roasted red pepper, cut in strips
Lemon, for garnish

Discard the empty half shells of the mussels. Strain the liquid and reserve it. Cook 6-8 unpeeled shrimp in boiling water for 1 minute. Set them aside and add the liquid to the mussel liquid . Shell the remaining prawns.

Heat the oil in a paella pan or large frying pan (about 16 inches across). Fry the chicken pieces, adding next the green peppers, then the tomato, garlic and peas, beans or artichokes.  Combine the reserved liquid and stock or water to make 6 1/2 cups. Add all but 1 cupful of the liquid to the paella. Crush the saffron in a mortar or in a teacup using the butt-end of a knife. Dissolve it in a little water or white wine and stir into the paella with the pepper and salt. Add the peeled prawns. When the liquid comes to a boil, add the rice and continue to cook on a high heat for 6 to  8 minutes. Then reduce the heat and continue to cook until rice is just barely tender, adding the additional liquid as needed, about 8-10 minutes more. Don’t stir the rice, but shake the pan. Garnish the top with the reserved mussels, cooked prawns and strips of roasted red pepper. Let the paella rest for 5 minutes before serving with lemon wedges.

Makes 6 servings.

From “Tapas and More Great Dishes from Spain” by Janet Mendel

If you have a question for Ask a Foodie, e-mail walker@savorsa.com or griffin@savorsa.com.

Photo courtesy Johnny Hernandez

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Pork Rules at Paella Challenge


Jeff Balfour's paella

Want to make your own award-winning paella at home? Start with a whole roasted pig.

That was chef Jeff Balfour’s secret at Sunday’s second annual Paella Challenge at the Pearl Brewery.

“We took a roasted whole pig, a happy little Texas pig,” said a beaming and exhausted Balfour of Citrus at the Hotel Valencia, 150 E. Houston St., shortly after winning the award. His team used the shoulder and the butt among other fleshy parts in the paella itself and then garnished each serving with succulent bits of tongue and cheek.

It was over the top and gave Balfour victory in the competition. “We placed third last year and first this year,” he said, while holding the crown-shaped award.

Jeffrey Balfour of Citrus with his award.

Balfour offers paella at Citrus, but it’s a made-to-order version. For those who couldn’t make Sunday’s Paella Challenge but want to try the chef’s winning creation, it will likely be offered for a few nights in the near future, he said. Call 210-230-8412 for more details.

Winning second place was the team from Lüke, which is near Citrus at 125 E. Houston St. “They’re practically just right across the street from us,” Balfour said.

Chef Stephen McHugh, who worked with John Besh on the Lüke team, also used pork in their paella. Pork belly, actually, which was mixed with crawfish. McHugh was grateful for second place considering it was the team’s first time to participate.

Third place went to Jhojans Priego of Villa Rica in Veracruz, Mexico.

Last year’s champion, Ben Ford of Ford’s Filling Station in Culver City, Calif., had planned on defending his title. But word had it that a bad case of food poisoning prevented him from showing.

Crowds enjoy the perfect weather as well as the excellent food.

What he missed was an imaginative array of paellas that used ingredients in wholly unexpected ways, said Leslie Horne of Aurelia’s Chorizo in Boerne. Truffles and foraged mushrooms as well as her chorizo were among the ingredients the throngs sampled in the various dishes served throughout the day.

“The imagination that went into all of these dishes was most impressive, to say the least,” Horne said. “They went the whole hog with Jeffrey’s.”

The most creative, in her opinion was a Thai green curry paella from Jeffrey Axell of the Grand Hyatt, 600 E. Market St. The dish was a way of showing off the restaurant’s new Asian fusion cuisine.

Ford may not have made the event, but other chefs from around the country did. A few included Kent Rathbun of Abacus in Dallas, Peter Holt of Houston’s Lupe Tortilla, Dale Miller of Sperry’s in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and Tim McCarty of the Mayo Foundation in Rochester, Minn., who was grateful for the balmy weather.

Paellas of all different flavors filled the event.

Local chefs who served up paellas to the hungry masses included Craig Bianco of RK Group, Brian West of the Hotel Contessa, Jason Dady of the Lodge Restaurant of Castle Hills and others, and David Wirebaugh of the downtown Hyatt Regency.

Johnny Hernandez of La Gloria Ice House at the Pearl and True Flavors Catering organized the event, which benefits scholarship programs at the Culinary Institute of America’s San Antonio campus and the Education Foundation of the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

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Ask a Foodie: Why Is Saffron So Expensive? Are There Substitutes?


Saffron threads suffuse food with a dusky, exotic flavor and golden color.

Q. I love the color and flavor of saffron, especially in paella, but it’s expensive. Can you substitute other seasonings when it is called for in a dish, such as achiote or turmeric?     — K.W.

A. Saffron is one of the world’s more exotic flavorings, used since ancient times and difficult to harvest. The thin threads are pricey, but the flavor is really what makes it all worth it. It has a dusky perfume that suffuses anything from delicate rice dishes or hearty stews. It’s delicious with fish or chicken and a perfect seasoning for slow-simmered lentils or garbanzo beans.

If it is just a pale golden or slightly orange color you want to impart to food, and all you have on hand is turmeric, a pinch or two of this less-expensive spice, in dried form, is OK to use. Fresh turmeric (from the rhizome, part of the root system, of a tropical plant) has a more pungent flavor, and is good on its own terms, not just as a substitute for saffron.

Achiote (from annatto seeds, from a tropical evergreen plant)  is mild in flavor but will yield a more reddish-orange color. It is used to color some cheeses, for instance, as an alternative to artificial colorings that might cause allergic reactions.

The reason for saffron’s expense is first that while the saffron crocus grows in places throughout the planet, it doesn’t grow just anywhere. The stigma, or threads that are the female part of the plant’s reproductive system, must be painstakingly hand-harvested from the blossom of a type of crocus plant. But a little saffron goes a long way, and it’s a valued addition to any good cook’s spice cabinet.

Photograph by Bonnie Walker

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Chicken, Chorizo and Mushroom Paella


Few dishes are more festive than a paella cooked outdoors. Fire up the grill and enjoy a warm evening with friends. The entire paella can be cooked on the grill; just cover with foil during the last 5 minutes of cooking, and let the foil remain while the paella rests. This dish, created by Leslie Horne of Les Dames d’Escoffier, will be served at the 2010 Olives Olé  on March 27 at Sandy Oaks Olive Orchard.

Chicken, Chorizo and Mushroom Paella

Terry Thompson Anderson’s Secret Poultry Spice Rub:
1/4 cup cumin seed
2 tablespoons coriander seed
1 1/2 teaspoons Tellicherry peppercorns
1 tablespoon paprika
2 tablespoons Spanish smoked paprika
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons salt

Paella:
6 cups chicken broth
¼ teaspoon crumbled saffron threads
3 tablespoons spice rub
Kosher salt
6 chicken thighs
¼ cup olive oil
1 onion, finely diced
1 red bell pepper, chopped
3 links Aurelia’s Spanish Style Chorizo or other Spanish-style chorizo, sliced into ¼ inch thick sliced (see note)
8 ounces white mushrooms, sliced
1 medium tomato, grated or finely diced
6 garlic cloves, minced
4 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
3 cups short grain rice
2 cups green peas
Roasted red pepper strips for garnish (Can be purchased in a jar, or roast your own)

To make the spice mix, toast the cumin and coriander seeds until very aromatic.  Grind them to a powder with the peppercorns.  Transfer to a small bowl and blend in remaining spices, mixing thoroughly.  Store in airtight container.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Combine chicken broth and saffron in large pot and heat to almost boiling. (Do not let it boil, or it will evaporate.) Dust spice rub and salt over chicken thighs.

In a 15-inch paella pan, over 2 burners, heat olive oil.  Brown chicken on all sides, but do not cook through. Remove from pan and set aside. Add onion and bell pepper, cooking until onion is wilted and translucent. Add chorizo and mushrooms, cook for 2 minutes. Add tomato, garlic and parsley. Continue to cook, stirring frequently, until mushrooms begin to soften and garlic becomes aromatic.

Add 3 cups rice; stir to coat with pan drippings. Return chicken thighs to pan. Carefully add the hot saffron chicken broth. Taste and adjust the salt if needed. Bring the stock to a boil; cook for 5 – 7 minutes rotating pan over two burners. Scatter peas evenly over entire pan but do not stir. Garnish the top of paella with strips of roasted red peppers.

Place in preheated oven and continue to cook for 15-20 min. or until rice is al dente. Remove from oven and cover with foil and let sit for 5-10 minutes. Serve and enjoy!

(Photo: Tracie Maurer)

Note: Mexican-style chorizo cannot be substituted in the recipe.

Paella serves 6.  Spice Rub makes about 3/4 cup.

From Leslie Horne

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Rice Rules at Pearl Paella Party



Waldy Malouf’s Paella is artfully arranged with seafood and vegetables on top.

It was a beautiful day for a cook-off Sunday and the Pearl Brewery, in front of the Culinary Institute of America, offered a perfect setting for the first ever Cocina de las Americas. The big event was a Paella Cook-Off.


Rene Fernandez of Azuca stirs rice into a paella that he made out of competition during Sunday’s paella cook-off.

When the flames under the huge paella pans were extinguished in the afternoon, judges chose their winners. First place went to chef and restaurateur Ben Ford, of Ford’s Filling Station in Culver City, CA. Peter Holt and crew from Lupe Tortilla Mexican Restaurant in Houston,  took second place and San Antonio chef, Jeffrey Balfour of Citrus, at the Valencia Hotel, took third.

There were as many imaginative takes on paella as there were teams — 16 in all. These included celebrity chefs Waldy Malouf of New York (Beacon and Waldy’s restaurants in New York City) and Ford. Each team drew long lines, as attendees waited patiently for tastes of the famous, saffron-laced Spanish rice dish.

SavorSA was there, too. The writers of this article admit they had a few minutes of high excitement when the chef we’d been assigned to help ran late. Michael Gilleto, chef of a private club in New Jersey, flew in Sunday and arrived in the nick of time, but not before his two nervous assistants had dashed off to the huge food pantry in the middle of the grounds to snatch up ingredients. If Gilleto didn’t make it, we figured we’d pinch hit and make our own paella.


Chef Michael Giletto plates his paella for judging.

Gilleto showed up, though, and we were off — slicing, dicing, killing lobsters, cutting up whole chickens, cleaning shrimp and dashing around looking for a few ingredients we’d missed during the first mad rush.

Gilleto liked a classic-style paella, one traditionally more about rice and olive oil than about masses of seafood, chicken, chorizo and more ingredients piled high. We were with him on that.

Along with the usual ingredients in the pantry we noticed bags of chopped pineapple, hoja santa plants (sometimes called the root beer plant), ancho chiles and more. We said “yes” to the ancho chiles, which Gilleto wanted to flavor the stock, but we all tacitly agreed “no” on the pineapple.

One crew decorated their paella with julienned carrots. Another crew had help from one of their member’s grandmother, who hailed from the northern principality of Asturias, Spain.


bout 1,000 people, including families, turned out to the first paella cook-off.

Shelley Grieshaber, culinary director at the Pearl Brewery and CIA graduate, made her way from table to table doing the “color” interviews for the day. Johnny Hernandez, chef and owner of Pearl’s upcoming La Gloria restaurant, and driving force behind the cook-off, alternated roles between host and trouble shooter.

“We couldn’t have asked for a more beautiful day,” said Grieshaber, who was excited at the success of the event.

San Antonio Food Bank culinary students were on hand to assist. Chef Rene Fernandez of Azuca made a huge paella prior to the contest to serve to the hungry masses. Other San Antonio chefs in the competition included Jason Dady, Dave Souter and Brian West, as well as a crew from the R.K. Group and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.


Ben Ford, right, shakes hands with a fellow chef after winning the paella cook-off.

Proceeds from ticket sales will be going toward scholarship opportunities at the CIA San Antonio to benefit local chefs.  A portion of proceeds will also go to the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Office of the Honorary Council to Spain for educational initiatives benefiting San Antonio students. H-E-B/Central Market were presenting sponsors of the community event, in partnership with the Culinary Institute of America.

It was a fun competition, and one we hope to see again next year.

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Paella Cook-Off at Pearl, Iron Chef-style


The first-ever Cocina de las Americas, a one-day community event, will be held on the grounds of the Pearl, 312 Pearl Parkway, on March 14.  Chefs will vie for a prize, competing Iron Chef style, to make the best Spanish Paella, the country’s famous rice dish.

H-E-B/Central Market are presenting sponsors of this community event, in partnership with the Culinary Institute of America.  Co-chairs of the event are Chef Johnny Hernandez of True Flavors and Dya Campos, Director of Public Affairs for H-E-B.  The San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and New World Wine and Food Festival also are supporting and promoting the event.

The public is invited to enjoy live entertainment and sampling of food from Spain, including sangria, Spanish hams and cheeses and an array of tapas, or Spanish small plates, prepared by CIA San Antonio students.

All food and beverage stations will be located in the Fountain Plaza. Live entertainment will be in the Main Stage Train area.

Chefs will compete with a full pantry of ingredients while guests can watch the cooking action in full swing.

Proceeds from ticket sales will go toward scholarship opportunities to the CIA San Antonio to benefit local chefs.  A portion of proceeds will also go to the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Office of the Honorary Council to Spain for educational initiatives benefiting San Antonio students.

Admission to the festival is $40. Doors open to the public at 11 a.m., judging is at 1:45 p.m. and the event ends at about 4 p.m. Tickets are $40; $20 ages 21 and under. Tickets can be purchased online at nwwff.frontgatetickets.com and www.ciacocinadelasamericas.com.

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