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The Witte Wants to Help You Stick to Those New Year’s Resolutions


The Witte Museum, 3801 Broadway, wants to help you stick to those resolutions to eat better this year. So, they’re offering a little help from a local chef as part of Salud! Culinary Nights, which is set for 6:30 p.m. Jan. 14.

culinary nightsThe tasty and interactive evening will feature chef Zach Lutton, executive chef of Zedric’s Fit With Flavor, which has two San Antonio locations. He’ll be offering healthy foods for the new year: Zedric’s Chicken Tortilla Soup with an Avocado Relish, Pecan Crusted Chicken with Brown Rice Pilaf and Ratatouille with Roasted Red Pepper Sauce and Organic Peanut Butter Chocolate Chews with Fresh Berries.

Enjoy conversation with tips for a healthier, new you while sipping wine from Bending Branch Winery that has been paired with each menu item. Bending Branch Winery is a sustainable practice and organically focused operation with award-winning wines, including their Petite Sirah, Picpoul Blanc, Cabernet and more.

Set in the Children’s Hospital of San Antonio Demonstration Kitchen in the brand new H-E-B Body Adventure Powered by University Health System, Salud! Culinary Nights programs continue the H-E-B Body Adventure’s mission to provide the community with healthy lifestyle alternatives through local chefs and a diverse array of cuisines and topics focusing on empowerment, health IQ and wellness. Meet local chefs, farmers, ranchers and food historians in an intimate setting as they present information, history and stories about the selected Salud! Culinary Nights menu.

Each program will also feature a wine, beer or cocktail pairing from Texas winemakers, brewers and mixologists.

This class is limited to 60 guests per evening and tickets start at $50 per person, $45 for Witte members and include a souvenir wine glass. For more information, call (210) 357-1910 or visit www.WitteMuseum.org.

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Paella’s a Dish You Can Make to Suit Your Tastes


Food lovers watch Zach Lutton (center) and an assistant create a massive paella with plenty of seafood in it.

Food lovers watch Zach Lutton (center) and an assistant create a massive paella with plenty of seafood in it.

Making a good paella is all about layering the flavors you have, which could be anything from lobster and clams to chicken and chorizo. Then there’s the sofrito, an aromatic mixture of garlic, tomatoes, peppers and onions cooked in olive oil, as well as saffron and rice.

Zach Lutton of Zedric's adds a prawn to his paella.

Zach Lutton of Zedric’s adds a prawn to his paella.

But the key ingredient, in Zach Lutton’s opinion, is the stock.

That’s what the owner of Zedric’s Healthy Gourmet to Go believes, and it’s what he says helped him win second place in last year’s Paella Challenge at the Pearl Brewery. This year’s challenge is Sunday, and Lutton will be back, hoping to move up to first place. To give himself a warmup and promote the event, he offered a demonstration of how to make the Spanish dish during a recent Pearl Farmers Market. If the reaction of the crowd is any indication, his bounteous tray topped with heads-on prawns, mussels, clams, baby octopi, chorizo, peas, red bell peppers and even some lemon halves should keep him in the running.

“The stock is the most important ingredient in the whole dish,” he said, adding that he had made his with both lobster bodies and chicken.  “It is the flavor of the paella.”

But that doesn’t mean you’re home free if you’ve got good stock. Paella takes practice, Lutton said.

“This isn’t a quick thing,” he told the crowded class during his cooking demonstration. “Take your time with it. Practice it a few times.”

To begin, decide the ingredients you are going to use. Start with the rice, which should be short grain, such as Bomba, not arborio, which is the rice used in risotto. If chicken is on the list, brown it in some olive oil at the bottom of the pan, but don’t cook it through. You can remove it and use the oil base to make your sofrito, though Lutton doesn’t. He slow cooks his for two hours and lets it rest over night.

But this the time to add it to the pan. Then the rice goes in and each grain gets coated. This is the point when the chicken returns to the pan as well as the chorizo, followed by the stock. Again, this is not risotto, so you don’t stir and stir until each last drop of stock has been absorbed. In fact, you don’t stir the dish at all as it cooks over the heat. But you do need to watch it. After 15 minutes or so, “when you see the rice coming up and the liquid disappearing, you’re headed in the right direction,” the chef said.

Zach Lutton dishes up paella.

Zach Lutton dishes up paella.

Be careful that too much liquid doesn’t disappear or you could burn your paella. Expert paella makers want a crusty bottom, which is also known as socarrat, but no one wants it burned. And Lutton advised beginners not to worry about that. He admitted that he doesn’t pay attention to that when he’s making paella, though it is one of the categories paellas are judged on in competitions.

He was more concerned about getting the seasoning right. Paella is a subtle dish, so a strong spice such as saffron has to be used judiciously. “Don’t add too much saffron, because it can overpower the dish,” he said. He limits his other seasonings to salt and pepper.

Shortly before the broth had been absorbed, Lutton and his assistants added the seafood to the top, again not stirring the mixture. Instead, they planted the bottom of the shellfish into the rice mixture, so the heat could cook them, allowing the mussels and clams to open. The enormous prawns were set in a ring at the center, while the baby octopi were arranged in a ring around the outside. Peas and red peppers were sprinkled on top, adding color as well as flavor.

The entire pan was then covered in aluminum foil so it could rest before serving. The crowd was getting a little hungry, waiting for a sample. “I promise y’all’ll eat soon,” he said with a chuckle. “Just give me about 10 more minutes.”

Tenting the pan allowed the steam to cook any of the seafood above the rice. It also released an enticing aroma that had people eager to try a dish, which Lutton and one of his assistants spooned up in generous amounts, making sure people could taste whatever they wanted from the array of meats that had been included.

Only Lutton seemed to find fault with the paella, which he said was slightly soupy. “But it’s still good, no matter what,” he added. “That stock is awesome.”

Zach Lutton's paella

Zach Lutton’s paella

If you want to make your own paella, be aware that proportions vary depending on the size of the pan used. Pans run in size from 7 1/2 inches to those more than several feet wide. Your best bet is to find a recipe, such as Leslie Horne’s for Texas Quail, Chorizo and Mushroom Paella, which was created for a 15-inch paella and serves about six people. You can find paella pans and burners at GauchoGourmet, 935 Isom Road, and Melissa Guerra Tienda de Cocina in the Pearl Brewery, 312 Pearl Parkway.

You can also make paella any way you like. In Spain, you might find some cooks using pasta instead of rice. You could use only vegetables or only seafood, eliminate the seafood entirely or add what you have in the freezer.

I judged a non-traditional paella challenge in Austin last fall alongside James Canter, the chef who won last year’s Paella Challenge. We tasted a Hawaiian paella seasoned with jamaica, or hibiscus flowers, and another topped with fried eggs and avocado in a ranchero style. One team offered a chicken tinga paella with radishes and cotija cheese. There was even a dessert paella, which was actually more like rice pudding. The winner was a soul food paella made with pig’s feet, ham hocks and chicken gizzards among an array of down-home ingredients. The pictures below illustrate that the type of paella you make is bounded only by your own imagination.

For information on the fourth annual Paella Challenge, click here.

Paella Ranchero

Paella Ranchero

Soul Food Paella

Soul Food Paella

A Hawaiian paella with shrimp, pineapple, artichokes and hibiscus rice.

A Hawaiian paella with shrimp, pineapple, artichokes and hibiscus rice.

Chicken Tinga Paella

Chicken Tinga Paella

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You Can Order All or Part of Your Thanksgiving Feast


The County Line’s smoked turkey breast is available for your party.

Whether you need help with dessert or the entire meal, you can find plenty of places in town that will help you out this Thanksgiving. Ordering early always helps.

Aldaco’s, 100 Hoefgen Ave., Sunset Station, (210) 222-0561; 20079 Stone Oak Parkway, (210) 494-0561 — Aldaco’s regular tres leches cake is available year-round. The seasonal flavor is Pumpkin Tres Leches, which is available for $39.95 for a 9-inch cake. Orders must be placed in advance and picked up by the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, all day at the Stone Oak location and by 3 p.m. at Sunset Station.

Big Bob’s Burgers, 447 W. Hildebrand, (210) 734-BOBS (2627) — Big Bob’s is smoking 15-pound turkeys this Thanksgiving season. The price is $39.95. Orders should be placed by Nov. 16 with the pickup running through closing time on Nov. 21.

Central Market, 4821 Broadway, (210) 368-8607 — Chef-prepared meals, sides and pies can be ordered for all your holiday needs. Or visit the website.

Chile Beach Jams at Saglimbeni Fine Wines, 638 W. Rhapsody, (210) 349-5149 — Order a handmade pumpkin spice roll from Chile Beach Jams. Place and pick up the orders at Saglimbeni Fine Wines. Call for prices.

CIA Bakery & Cafe, 312 Pearl Parkway, (210) 554-6464 — The CIA Bakery is offering pies this Thanksgiving in addition to its breads and other desserts. Pumpkin pies are $15.50 each and apple and pecan pies are $19.50. Orders must be received by Nov. 17. They can be placed in person at the café or by calling the number listed. Pies can be picked up on Tuesday, Nov. 20, and Wednesday, Nov. 21, during business hours, 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

The County Line, 10101 I-10 W., (210) 641-1998 — Treat yourself to any of a number of specials from the County Line. A boneless turkey breast generously rubbed with coarse black pepper and slow-smoked is sold for $16.19 a pound. The average weight is 4 pounds and feeds 10-12 people. Barbecue lovers can order an Emergency Kit priced at $11.99 a person. It comes with brisket, turkey, sausage, chicken, coleslaw, beans, potato salad, bread, barbecue sauce, plates and flatware, packed family style. No advance warning necessary, but you can call in your order and it will be waiting for you by the time you get to the restaurant.  Sides available in large portions include handmade bread, red skinned garlic mashed potatoes, mac ‘n cheese, salads and green beans. Fresh harvest cobbler (Granny Smith Green Apples, candied cranberries and walnuts) will be sold for $55; it serves 25-30 people. County Line’s Bread Pudding with Jack Daniel’s Bourbon sauce is $6.99 a serving; it’s enough for two people.

Pumpkin pie with a gluten-free crust can be ordered from the CIA Bakery.

Crumpets, 3920 Harry Wurzbach, (210) 821-5454 — You can order whole turkeys and hams to go with all the trimmings but without all the work. Desserts to go are also available.

Earl Abel’s, 1201 Austin Hwy., (210) 822-7333  — Orders for takeout, from turkey or ham dinners to pies, cakes and sides, should be made by Nov. 19. All pre-orders must be paid when the order is called in. Specials include a 23-pound oven-roasted turkey or a 6- to 8-pound honey-glazed ham for $160 and $145, respectively. The turkey package serves approximately 20 to 25. The family package includes 4 quarts of cornbread dressing, 1 quart of giblet gravy, 1 quart of cranberry relish, 25 yeast dinner rolls, and a free pumpkin pie and apple pie. A ½ turkey family package is priced at $100; a whole turkey  for $100; and a ½ turkey for $65. Sides such as green beans, candied yams, mashed potatoes, creamed corn, glazed carrots and many others can be purchased for $9.50 a quart; and our dinner rolls can be purchased for 35 cents each, minimum order of ½ dozen.

New Braunfels Smokehouse, 1090 N. Business I-35, New Braunfels, (830) 625-2416 — You can order everything from smoked turkeys to sides. Also check out the website.

Paloma Blanca, 5800 Broadway, (210) 822-6151 — Pumpkin tamales are available in your choice of pineapple or raisin for $10 a dozen. Tres leches cake lovers can get Paloma Blanca’s version, which is infused with pumpkin, topped with pecans, and covered in creamy milk (a whole cake costs $34.95). Thanksgiving orders require a 48-hour notice and need to be placed by phone or online (www.palomablanca.net) by Nov. 20, as the restaurant will be closed on Thanksgiving day.

Pappy G’s, 1210 Pat Booker Road, (210) 659-7799 — Get holiday pies (sweet potato, buttermilk, pecan or cream cheese) and large orders of sides, including cornbread dressing. Orders should be picked up by 6 p.m. Nov. 21.

Ordering side dishes, such as cranberries, can take some of the work load off.

Mike’s in the Village, 2355-3 Bulverde Road, Bulverde, (830) 438-2747 — Mike’s is taking orders for savory cheesecakes to be used as party appetizers or however you want to serve them. They come in three flavors: crawfish, portobello mushroom and green chili. Prices are $75 for an 8-inch cheesecake or $90 for an 11-inch.

Two Step Restaurant & Cantina, 9840 W. Loop 1604 N., (210) 688-2686 — Beginning on Monday, Nov. 21st, Two Step Restaurant & Cantina will take orders for apple, pecan, and pumpkin pies for $24.95 each. Pies will be available for pick-up as late as Wednesday, Nov. 21, until 10:00 p.m.

Whole Foods, 255 E. Basse Road, (210) 826-4676; 18403 Blanco Road, (210) 408-3110 — Pies, turkeys, side dishes, breads — all are available for special order.

Zedric’s: Fresh Gourmet to Go, 9873 I-10 W., (210) 541-0404 — Zedric’s is offering the follow meals to go throughout the holiday season, but they are available by advanced order only: Turkey Dinner for 6-8 with Oven-roasted Turkey Breast with Gravy, Chorizo Cornbread Dressing, Herb Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans Amandine and Orange Zest Cranberry Sauce, $139.99; Rack of Lamb Dinner for 6-8 with Oven-roasted Rack of Lamb with Au Jus, Chorizo Cornbread Dressing, Herb Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans Amandine and Orange Zest Cranberry Sauce, $209.99; and Mom’s Apple Crunch Pie, $15.99. Place your Thanksgiving order by Nov. 19 with pickup from 7 a.m.-8 p.m. on Nov. 21.

 

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Try It. It’s Good for You. And It Tastes Great.


Chef John Brand and his son, Malachi, prepare amaranth-crusted avocado.

Fall announced its arrival Sunday with temperatures dropping to the 50s and a definite nip in the air.

Mela offers two types of Indian chicken.

Yet that didn’t stop hundreds of people from reaching the Pearl Brewery Sunday on bike, on foot and in their cars for the first Feastivál, a tribute to healthy eating that Culinaria presented with H-E-B.

While they sipped wine and sampled healthy snacks from area restaurants and food purveyors, they listened to Dan Evans, a country singer who lost 136 pounds on TV’s “The Biggest Loser” and worked up some warmth doing a few zumba steps. Cooking demonstrations and wine seminars were on the menu as well.

Some of the snacks included a lemon seafood salad from chef Jeffrey Balfour at Citrus in the Hotel Valencia, amaranth-crusted avocado from chef John Brand of Las Canarias and Ostra, chicken tikka and tandoori chicken from Mela, black beans and brown rice from EZ’s, and guacamole with mango salsa on a jicama base from Paloma Blanca. Mike Behrend’s Green Vegetarian Cuisine offered a mixed plate with a pea, baby lima, edamame and carrot salad tossed with a touch of truffle oil.

Citrus’ Jeffrey Balfour presents a lemony seafood salad.

Jesse Perez, whose Arcade is opening at the Pearl later this year, offered a warming cup of butternut squash soup with feta. Steven McHugh, whose restaurant at the Pearl will opening the spring, offered roasted beets with blood orange over an avocado-ricotta spread. The two bros., Jason and Jake Dady, were on hand with smoked turkey from their Two Bros. BBQ Market.

A group of students from the Culinary Institute of America lit the fire pit and drew diners with tea-smoked salmon over vegetable couscous.

H-E-B, Zeric’s, Brio Tuscan Grille, and Eoni, which makes Bazookie whole grain and fruit bars, also offered tasty treats.

“It was amazing and healthy,” said Culinaria CEO Suzanne Taranto Etheredge, adding that both sponsoring organizations were pleased with the turnout and the fact that word is getting out that healthful food can taste great.

A group of students from the CIA dishes up tea-smoked salmon at the fire pit.

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Paella and Perfect Weather, Just as Johnny Hernandez Ordered It


Zach Lutton of Zedric's makes his paella, which won second place in the challenge.

Ty-Lor Boring uses his burner to cook lobster.

Saturday did not end on a pretty note, in terms of weather. Cold, miserable rain left the ground saturated and spirits low. Luminaria had to be postponed, and hopes were not high for the third annual Paella Challenge at the Pearl Brewery.

"Top Chef" favorite Lindsay Autry

Yet on Sunday morning, the clouds fled the scene, leaving a healing sun in its wake that dried out the amphitheater and made for a perfect afternoon that drew hundreds of people who wanted to sample paella made by many of the city’s best chefs as well as several out-of-town visitors, including several chefs from the recent “Top Chef” Texas season.

Credit for the success of the event goes to organizer Johnny Hernandez, said David Kellaway, managing director of the Culinary Institute of America’s San Antonio campus, which is also at the brewery.

The event is a fundraiser for the culinary school as well as the educational arm of the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

“The energy and passion (Hernandez displays) towards educating our youth in the culinary arts cannot be quantified,” Kellaway said.

The student team from Lanier placed second in the new high school challenge.

Hernandez, who owns La Gloria Ice House and True Flavors Catering, had wanted the lot power washed before the event, and it seems as if God obliged, the school official joked.

The styles of paella varied greatly. Jason Dady and his crew presented a version blackened with squid ink yet brightened with fresh green herbs. The folks from Max’s Wine Dive offered a Texas paella with game meats and a chipotle butter. Visiting chef Tim McCarty from Minnesota offered three P’s: pork, prawns and popcorn, with ribs and pork belly in the mix.

Mustachioed chef  Ty-Lor Boring from “Top Chef” added a dramatic touch by firing his lobster directly in the flames of his burner. Last year’s champion, Jeff Balfour of Citrus at the Hotel Valencia, offered a paella that featured chicken and arrived topped with egg, which was meant to leave you wondering which came first.

Winning chef James Canter celebrates with his son.

In the end only three of more than two dozen entries would be honored. They were, in order, James Canter of Alhambra in McAllen; Zach Lutton of Zedric’s: Healthy Gourmet to Go, 9873 I-1o W.; and Peter Holt of Lupe Tortilla, which has a San Antonio location at 21103 U.S. 281 N.

Canter arrived at the winner’s table with his son perched high on one shoulder, prompting Kellaway to remark that he had already been given the best award of all.

This year, for the first time, San Antonio high schools were eligible to complete in their own division. Six schools showed up, including Burbank, John Jay, Lanier, McCollum, Memorial and Roosevelt. There was a lot riding on a terrific paella from the students, because the winning team will receive a four-day, all-expenses-paid trip to the CIA’s main campus in Hyde Park.

The winners, in order, were John Jay, Lanier and Memorial.

McCarty, who works for Sodexo, participated last year and was certainly enjoying himself once more. “As long as I make a great paella, I’m already a winner,” he said, while spooning up plates and handing them to the crowds that waited in line.

It's paella for all, with many of the chefs, including Steven McHugh of Luke, making multiple trays.

It's paella for all, with many of the chefs, including Steven McHugh of Luke, making multiple trays.

 

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Restaurant Notes & Quotes: Whataburger Helps Santa; Zedric’s Open; Z’Tejas Begins Brunch


Santa, Whataburger employees and Christmas Under the Bridge help some children have a merry Christmas.

Santa, Whataburger and Christmas Under the Bridge make the season bright.

Spreading Christmas cheer.

Whataburger gives Santa a hand

This year, Whataburger partnered with Christmas Under the Bridge as part of Whataburger Serves, the company’s long-term series of themed activities that demonstrate Whataburger’s service-oriented approach to business.

Employees from the burger chain collected 550 toys from an internal toy drive and more than 60 employees helped Santa this past Saturday distribute toys under the bridge.

As you can see from the photos, the children were more than happy to meet Santa and party with people from both organizations.

Boys & Girls Club members get cooking

The Boys & Girls Clubs of San Antonio hosted its fifth annual luncheon at Citrus in the Hotel Valencia, 150 E. Houston St.

With the help of Citrus’ executive chef Jeffrey Balfour, children from each of the area’s five Boys & Girls Clubs branches helped prepare the meal, which was served to 14 people including club board members and community supporters.

In addition, the hotel presented the Boys & Girls Clubs of San Antonio officials with dozens of toys collected from guests and employees through the hotel’s annual toy drive.

A healthy choice for those on the run

Zedric’s has opened at 2267 N.W. Military Hwy.

The healthy, gourmet-to-go place is open 10 a.m.-7 p.m. daily.

Chef Zach Lutton is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., who returned to his hometown of San Antonio to cook. Once home, he noticed there was a shortage of “healthy, delicious food in San Antonio and that it was a difficult place to be health conscious,” he writes.

So, he devised a daily menu from breakfast to dinner with dietitian Victoria Dominguez that includes cage-free eggs, local produce when available and organic weekly specials. There are vegetarian dishes as well as nut-free items. All are prepared in advance and can be heated when needed.

A few items include Ground Turkey Picadillo Breakfast Tacos, Hawaiian Cobb Salad, Sirloin Steak Salad, Oven-roasted Pork Tenderloin, and Shrimp Whole Wheat Pasta Toss.

Call 210-541-0404. Click here for a menu and more information. Delivery is also available for a flat $10 fee.

If you have questions for a dietitian, Dominguez is available by appointment. Call 210-859-5673.

The agave plant

Cibolo Moon earns rare tequila certification

Cibolo Moon at the JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort, 23808 Resort Parkway, is the first restaurant in Texas to become T certified by the Consejo Regulador del Tequila, or Tequila Regulatory Council of Mexico.

“This is a true honor for us,” stated Scott Siebert, director of food and beverage for the resort. “Tequila is a specialty among our beverage offerings at Cibolo Moon and this designation highlights the work we have done to ensure our guests enjoy the finest tequilas available in the most unique and memorable ways.”

Cibolo Moon’s bar currently features more than 100 tequilas. Guests can enjoy a private tequila tasting, savor one of the many infused tequilas or have a favorite tequila custom-aged in one of the restaurant’s special oak barrels to enjoy on their next visit.

There are numerous requirements to receive the T certificate, including a list of drinks prepared using tequila, dishes in which one of the main ingredients is tequila, and at least 80 percent of the staff must be trained on tequila knowledge, such as the blue agave plant that is used to make tequila.

For information, call 210-276-2500.

Watermark Grill reopens

Watermark Grill, 18740 Stone Oak Parkway, has reopened under chef Philippe Pinon.

The new chef, who was most recently at the Ritz-Carlton Coconut Grove in Miami, has introduced a new menu featuring dishes such as Focaccia-crusted Atlantic Salmon with fennel and tomato confit,  Olive Tapenade Alaskan Halibut with rock shrimp and asparagus pomodore and  Chorizo-crusted Black Cod with potato baccalau and a sauvignon herbs sauce.

“Balance is very important, not only in the spices we use to ensure the best flavor, but also in making sure that as much emphasis is put on service and the guest experience,” the chef says.

More items from the menu include Velvet Lobster Bisque, Vegetable Minestrone and Gazpacho Andalou soups; Yellow and Red Roma Tomato Tart, Yellow Fin Tuna Tartar, Jumbo Lump Crab Cake, Rock Shrimp Avocado, Seared Nantucket Sea Scallops, King Crab Leg au Poivre, and Lobster and Truffle Mac ‘N’ Cheese appetizers; as well as Panzanella, Mixed Green; and Watermark Caesar salads.

Other entrées include Fisherman Marmite, a bouillabaisse-style dish; Seared Chilean Sea Bass with hearts of palm risotto and porcini mushroom foam; Rotisserie Achiote Organic Chicken;  Rosemary Citrus Gremolata New York Strip; and  Braised Chianti Beef Short Ribs.

Watermark Grill also has new hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday; and 10:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday. For information, call 210-483-7600.

Brunch at Z’Tejas every Saturday, Sunday

Z’Tejas Southwestern Grill, 15900 La Cantera Parkway, is now offering brunch on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Dishes include a spinach and wild mushroom omelet, breakfast enchiladas, Willie’s homemade buttermilk pancakes, and a Cajun ham omelet. The full menu can be found online at www.ztejas.com/sanantonio.

The Weekend Fun Bar during brunch hours features the following for $3.50: Bloody Mary with Grey Goose Vodka,         Bloody Maria with 1800 Silver Tequila,  screwdriver with Grey Goose Vodka and mimosa with Domain Ste. Michelle.

For more information, call 210-690-3334.

If you have restaurant information, e-mail info@savorsa.com.

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